July 31, 2006 11:16AM

Political Entrepreneurship

From the Washington Post:

[Kevin] Schieffer is trying to persuade the Federal Railroad Administration to give him a $2.5 billion loan for the project [to build a 1000‐​mile rail line from Wyoming to Minnesota], among the largest in history.


If it succeeds, it could be a boon to farmers — and Schieffer.


The project would cut transportation costs for coal, corn and ethanol, and would make Schieffer what Fortune magazine calls “America’s first self‐​made railroad baron since the days of Teddy Roosevelt.”…


“He’s talking about using eminent domain out here and just wiping out 110 or 120 farms and ranches out here,” [rancher Paul] Jensen said.


Schieffer received help from an old friend, someone he admired as a South Dakota basketball legend years ago: Sen. John Thune (R), who defeated Senate Majority Leader Thomas A. Daschle (D) in 2004.


Despite opposition from the White House, Thune helped persuade Congress last year to increase the amount of the program from $3.5 billion to $35 billion. Thune, who received campaign contributions from Schieffer and who earned $220,000 as DM&E’s chief lobbyist in the 18 months before joining the Senate, is promoting the project to lure jobs. The law would allow Schieffer to put down no collateral and to make no payments for up to six years. [Sen. Mark] Dayton and other critics fear that taxpayers would be on the hook if the project were to fail.

He’s no James J. Hill.

July 31, 2006 10:54AM

Two Former Police Chiefs on Overkill

Joseph McNamara — a 35‐​year law enforcement official, including 18 years as a police chief in Kansas City and San Jose — has kindly praised my recent report on police militarization.


Former Seattle police chief Norm Stamper also had some kind things to say about the paper.


The terrific group Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP) has also put out an extended press release and endorsement.

July 30, 2006 2:55PM

The Happiest Zombies

In the same vein as David's fascinating post below, here is a refreshingly accurate article on the relationship between wealth and self-reported happiness around the world from the New Scientist titled "Wealthy Nations Hold the Keys to Happiness." The occasion of the article is the publication of a world map by Adrian White, a Ph.D. psychology student at the University of Leicester, that vividly pictures self-reported life satisfaction around the world. The relationship between wealth and the percentage of people who say they are happy leaps out pretty clearly.

According to the analysis, a country's happiness is closely related to its wealth, along with the health and education levels of its people. It is no surprise that people spending heavily on healthcare, such as US citizens, rank highly, says White, as this investment increases life expectancy and general wellbeing.

"There is a belief that capitalism leads to unhappy people," he says. "However, when people are asked if they are happy with their lives, people in countries with good healthcare, a higher [earnings] per capita, and access to education were much more likely to report being happy."

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July 29, 2006 6:07PM

Capitalism Saves

The Sunday New York Times has a great article — the first of a series on aging — titled "So Big and Healthy Nowadays That Grandpa Wouldn't Even Know You." Reporter Gina Kolata begins with this 19th-century biography:

Valentin Keller enlisted in an all-German unit of the Union Army in Hamilton, Ohio, in 1862. He was 26, a small, slender man, 5 feet 4 inches tall, who had just become a naturalized citizen. He listed his occupation as tailor.

A year later, Keller was honorably discharged, sick and broken. He had a lung ailment and was so crippled from arthritis in his hips that he could barely walk.

His pension record tells of his suffering. “His rheumatism is so that he is unable to walk without the aid of crutches and then only with great pain,” it says. His lungs and his joints never got better, and Keller never worked again.

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July 28, 2006 4:59PM

Fusionism Gone Cold?

Here's a piece from the Washington Times covering last week's America's Future Foundation–sponsored debate between Reason's Nick Gillespie and National Review's Jonah Goldberg. The debate's topic was the state of the libertarian/conservative alliance (Or, as the ad copy put it, libertarians and conservatives: "are we best friends forever?"). I missed the debate, but in my view, the answer is emphatically "no." 

The American Prospect's Matt Yglesias provided one of the best short explanations for why the answer is "no" on his blog a while back. As a guy on the center-left, Yglesias stands well outside the conservative-libertarian alliance and thus may be in a better position than the rest of us to see what's going on. 

Matt points out that the Right is made up of two kinds of people, those who are "motivated primarily by a distrust of the state" and those who "are motivated more by a distrust of leftwingers." This is not quite the same as saying "the libertarian-conservative alliance is made up of libertarians and conservatives," since there are conservatives who are consistent opponents of statism and self-identified libertarians whose main focus is opposing the Left. 

From the New Deal to the 1990s, political conditions in America favored an anti-left/anti-state alliance, since the Left, for the most part, controlled the state:

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July 28, 2006 4:45PM

The New Social Engineering

Apparently I'm behind the times. I've always understood the term "social engineering" to mean what the American Heritage Dictionary calls "the practical application of sociological principles to particular social problems," or what Mises called "treat[ing] human beings in the same way in which the engineer treats the stuff out of which he builds bridges, roads, and machines."

But in Thursday's Wall Street Journal I discover that "social engineering" now means "tactics that try to fool users into giving up sensitive financial data that criminals can use to steal their money and even their identities." It includes "phishing" and other online scam tactics. If you Google "social engineering," you can wade through pages and pages before you find any links to the older meaning.

I guess there is a connection between the two kinds of social engineering. One online tech dictionary says, "Social engineering is manipulating people into doing what you want, in much the same way that electrical engineering is manipulating electronics into doing what you want."

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