Featured Events

March 23

What Voters Hate about Obamacare: Public Polling and the Affordable Care Act’s Impact on Healthcare Quality

What Voters Hate about Obamacare: Public Polling and the Affordable Care Act’s Impact on Healthcare Quality

Since 1994 public polling has looked at the popularity of many of the existing goals and provisions of Obamacare (like universal coverage and community rating) and has found that these provisions, when decoupled from costs, enjoy majority support among Americans. Yet again, today in 2017, our pollsters have replicated the same pattern but with a twist: what happens if the other side of the equation, the cost, is factored into the question? What happens to public support for the most popular provisions of Obamacare and further, how did this massive transformation of the health insurance markets affect the quality of healthcare people thought they were going to get as a result?

Join us as we dig into this new research and take the true measure of public attitudes toward the full implications of this legislation. Furthermore, we’ll examine how mandatory insurance irreparably undermines the very goal of insurance by destroying what Americans want more than anything from health insurance reform: quality healthcare.

March 8

Setting Infrastructure Priorities: Considerations for the 115th Congress

Setting Infrastructure Priorities: Considerations for the 115th Congress

Republicans and Democrats agree that more effort should be made to restore America’s infrastructure. But how should we decide what projects are funded? How much should be spent on new infrastructure and how much on reconstruction? How does funding and finance influence priorities? Should the goal be to create short-term jobs, long-term economic growth, or simply new transportation alternatives?

Join four leading transportation experts in a discussion of highways, transit, high-speed rail, airports and air traffic control, and transportation finance.

March 21

America Abroad: The United States’ Global Role in the 21st Century

America Abroad: The United States’ Global Role in the 21st Century

What is the proper global role for the United States in the 21st Century?
 

Since World War II, the United States, as the most powerful state, has chosen to be deeply engaged in the world. It has assumed responsibility for global peace and stability, guaranteed the security of dozens of foreign nations, promoted free trade, and posed as the policeman of the world by intervening in distant disputes with little direct relevance for core U.S. interests.

The bi-partisan consensus in support of this role has recently shown signs of wear. President Donald Trump criticized it, and won. Public opinion polls for the first time in recent years show significant support for pulling back from this activist foreign policy and pursuing a more modest, less costly approach to the world.

In America Abroad: The United States’ Global Role in the 21st Century, Stephen G. Brooks and William C. Wohlforth make a powerful case that America should continue its strategy of deep engagement. But what are the merits of an alternative approach, a grand strategy of restraint? Please join us as we discuss competing ideas about the future of U.S. foreign policy.

Past Events

March 21

America Abroad: The United States’ Global Role in the 21st Century

America Abroad: The United States’ Global Role in the 21st Century

Featuring the authors Stephen G. Brooks, Associate Professor of Government, Dartmouth College; William C. Wohlforth, Daniel Webster Professor of Government, Dartmouth College; with comments by Eugene Gholz, Associate Professor, LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin; Adjunct Scholar, Cato Institute; and Benjamin H. Friedman, Research Fellow in Defense and Homeland Security Studies, Cato Institute; moderated by John Glaser, Associate Director of Foreign Policy Studies, Cato Institute.

March 17

Rethinking Regulatory Takings: A Preview of Murr v. Wisconsin on the Eve of Oral Argument

Rethinking Regulatory Takings: A Preview of Murr v. Wisconsin on the Eve of Oral Argument

Opening remarks by Todd Gaziano, Executive Director, Pacific Legal Foundation DC Center; featuring Roger Pilon, Vice President, Legal Affairs, Cato Institute; Prof. Michael Pappas, Associate Professor of Law, University of Maryland, Francis King Carey School of Law; and Ilya Somin, Professor, Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University; moderated by Ilya Shapiro, Senior Fellow in Constitutional Studies, Cato Institute.

March 10

Everyone Loses: The Ukraine Crisis and the Ruinous Contest for Post-Soviet Eurasia

Everyone Loses: The Ukraine Crisis and the Ruinous Contest for Post-Soviet Eurasia

Featuring the co-author Samuel Charap, Senior Fellow for Russia and Eurasia, International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS); Former Senior Advisor, U.S. Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security; with comments by Emma Ashford, Research Fellow, Cato Institute; moderated by Christine Guluzian, Visiting Research Fellow, Cato Institute.