Featured Events

June 25

Eyes in the Sky: The Secret Rise of Gorgon Stare and How It Will Watch Us All

The ancient Greeks believed that the mythical Gorgon could turn those who stared at it to stone. The Pentagon’s surveillance technology named after this creature, Gorgon Stare, has used its aerial near-panopticon surveillance capabilities to turn Salafist insurgents into targets. But should such a powerful, virtually all-seeing aerial spying system be allowed to operate over American communities? Arthur Holland Michel, Deputy Director of the Center for the Study of the Drone, tackles this question in his new book, Eyes in the Sky: The Secret Rise of Gorgon Stare and How It Will Watch Us All. Join us on June 25 at 1:00 p.m. as an expert panel talks with Michel about his book and about Gorgon Stare’s implications for the constitutional rights of Americans.

Cato Book Forums are free of charge. To register to attend this event, click the button below and then submit the secure web form by 1:00PM EDT on Monday, June 24, 2019. If you have any questions pertaining to registration, you may e-mail events [at] cato.org.

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June 3

When All Else Fails: The Ethics of Resistance to State Injustice

When All Else Fails: The Ethics of Resistance to State Injustice

When is it appropriate to resist the agents of the state? For many, the answer may be (all too) easy: never. But the United States itself was founded on one such act of resistance, and libertarians have always been deeply skeptical that the agents of the state enjoy any special status in moral philosophy. May an individual legitimately resist state agents? In what cases is such resistance allowed? What methods may be used, and to what ends? Philosopher Jason Brennan argues that sometimes, individuals have not only a right to resist unjust state actions but even an obligation to do so.

June 6

Of Dogs and Men

Of Dogs and Men

The U.S. Department of Justice estimates that police officers shoot and kill more than 10,000 pet dogs in the United States every year. From SWAT raids to standard calls for service and police visits to wrong addresses, officers are often too quick to use lethal force against family pets, despite the fact that no police officer has ever been killed in the line of duty by a dog.


In the award-winning documentary Of Dogs and Men, director Michael Ozias and producer Patrick Reasonover delve into the culture of violence against dogs by police officers. Of Dogs and Men provides firsthand accounts of families and individuals who have suffered the loss of a dog killed during a confrontation with law enforcement.

The powerful film takes audiences on a journey with pet owners in pursuit of policy change in the legal system. The stories told in Of Dogs and Men have prompted cooperation and best-practices guidelines from law enforcement organizations such as the National Sheriffs’ Association.

Of Dogs and Men was chosen as part of the official selection at both the Anthem and the Austin film festivals and was awarded the Honorable Mention Audience Award at the Austin Film Festival. Victoria Stillwell, host of Animal Planet’s Its Me or the Dog, has said, “Every person who has a dog should watch this film. It could be the difference between life and death.”

Please join us Thursday, June 6, for a screening of the award-winning documentary Of Dogs and Men and a post-movie discussion with director Michael Ozias and producer Patrick Reasonover, moderated by Clark Neily, Vice President for Criminal Justice, Cato Institute.

Only the commentary of this event will be live streamed. To view the film, you must attend in person.

Past Events

June 19

Tyranny Comes Home: The Domestic Fate of U.S. Militarism

Tyranny Comes Home: The Domestic Fate of U.S. Militarism

Featuring the authors Christopher J. Coyne, Associate Professor of Economics, George Mason University; and Abigail R. Hall, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Tampa; moderated by Matthew Feeney, Director, Project on Emerging Technologies, Cato Institute.

June 18

Legal Immigration: Problems and Solutions

Legal Immigration: Problems and Solutions

Featuring Alex Nowrasteh, Director of Immigration Studies, Cato Institute; David Bier, Immigration Policy Analyst, Cato Institute; moderated by Jeff Vanderslice, Director of Government and External Affairs, Cato Institute.

June 12

Financial Inclusion: The Cato Summit on Financial Regulation

Financial Inclusion: The Cato Summit on Financial Regulation - Welcome and Keynote Address: Competition and Financial Inclusion

Featuring Chairman Jelena McWilliams, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation; Deputy Director Brian Johnson, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau; Barry Wides, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency; Tracy Basinger, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco; Lydia Beyoud, Bloomberg Law; Thomas P. Brown, Paul Hastings LLP; Jotaka Eaddy, LendUp; Rob Morgan, American Bankers Administration; George Selgin, Cato Institute; Steven Smith, Finicity; Diego Zuluaga, Cato Institute; Todd Zywicki, George Mason University and Cato Institute; Rodney Hood, Chairman, National Credit Union Association; Lydia Mashburn, Managing Director, Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives, Cato Institute.

June 11

Peering Beyond the DMZ: Understanding North Korea behind the Headlines

Peering Beyond the DMZ: Understanding North Korea behind the Headlines

Featuring Heidi Linton, Executive Director, Christian Friends of Korea; Randall Spadoni, North Korea Program Director and Senior Regional Advisor for East Asia, World Vision; and Daniel Jasper, Public Education and Advocacy Coordinator for Asia, American Friends Service Committee; moderated by Doug Bandow, Senior Fellow, Cato Institute.