Herbert A. Stiefel Center for Trade Policy Studies

By any reasonable measure, Americans are better off now than during comparable periods in the past, and expanding engagement in the global economy has played an important role in the ongoing, upward trend in American employment and living standards. To promote further progress for American workers and households, Congress and the administration should pursue policies that expand the freedom of Americans to participate in global markets.

Center for Trade Policy Studies scholars study a range of trade policy issues, including agriculture, manufacturing, and trade agreements. Center scholars also maintain an interactive web site that allows users to examine how Congress and its individual members have voted over the years on bills and amendments affecting the freedom of Americans to trade and invest in the global economy.

Of Special Note

Will Nonmarket Economy Methodology Go Quietly into the Night? U.S. Antidumping Policy toward China after 2016

U.S. Antidumping Policy toward China after 2016

The policy that would best serve a strong U.S. trade agenda and the American public is to end NME treatment of China by no later than December 2016. China’s NME designation currently serves as an excuse for lawless protectionism, which not only inflames trade relations, but imposes enormous costs on downstream U.S. industries and consumers. Nondiscriminatory treatment of Chinese imports would bring U.S. trade policy into compliance with WTO rules while reducing the distorting effect of antidumping measures on the U.S. economy.

New Paper

One Year into the TTIP Negotiations: Getting to Yes

This bulletin examines the current state of the TTIP talks relative to expectations and in the larger context of the world trading system. It describes some of the main stumbling blocks that have arisen and makes suggestions for moving the process forward.

Free Trade, Free Markets: Rating the Congress

Free Trade, Free Markets: Rating the Congress

This interactive web site allows users to examine how Congress and its individual members have voted over the years on bills and amendments affecting the freedom of Americans to trade and invest in the global economy. The web site includes votes previously examined in a series of Cato studies published from 1999 through 2005, as well as more recent votes.