No-Knock Warrants and the War on Drugs

Two recent stories on this subject in the New York Times remind us that, despite recent progress toward legalizing marijuana, the U.S. drug war is far from over. 

The articles support many libertarian views on drug policy: that legalization should include all drugs, not just marijuana; that the drug war disproportionately harms the poor and minorities; that prohibition erodes basic constitutional protections against unreasonable searches; that asset forfeiture laws create perverse incentives for law enforcement; and that prohibition senselessly militarizes local police.

One further interesting point is that law enforcement has its own reservations about no-knocks:

The National Tactical Officers Association, which might be expected to mount the most ardent defense, has long called for using dynamic entry [no knocks] sparingly. Robert Chabali, the group’s chairman from 2012 to 2015, goes so far as to recommend that it never be used to serve narcotics warrants.

“It just makes no sense,” said Mr. Chabali, a SWAT veteran who retired as assistant chief of the Dayton, Ohio, Police Department in 2015. “Why would you run into a gunfight? If we are going to risk our lives, we risk them for a hostage, for a citizen, for a fellow officer. You definitely don’t go in and risk your life for drugs.”

Exactly.

 

The Filibuster: A Primer

Most legal scholars agree that Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch has the necessary experience, expertise, and temperament to be confirmed as Justice Scalia’s replacement.  But suppose the Democrats decide to filibuster the nomination and Republicans can’t get the 60 votes needed to break the filibuster?  If that happens, you can expect the Republicans to “go nuclear” and change the filibuster rules so that only 51 votes are required to shut off debate.  To understand what that means, here’s a short backgrounder on the filibuster:

Senate filibusters have been around since 1837.  Beginning in 1917, a cloture vote to shut off debate required a 2/3 supermajority; that was changed to 60 votes in 1975.  Sen. Strom Thurmond (D-SC) set the record with a 1957 talk-a-thon against civil rights legislation: 24 hours, 18 minutes.  Nowadays, senators need not actually speak.  They merely announce their intent to prolong debate and that triggers the 60-vote cloture rule. 

Suppose senators want to revise the 60-vote rule.  Rules can be revised by majority vote.  But suppose further that the vote on revising the 60-vote rule is itself filibustered.  According to Senate rules, if a vote to change the 60-vote rule is filibustered, it takes two-thirds of the senators to break the filibuster.  The so-called nuclear option would override that rule.

There are two versions of the nuclear option – one simple and one complicated.  First, the simple version:  On the first day of a new Congress, Senate rules don’t yet apply.  Therefore, new rules can be adopted – and debate can be halted – by the default procedure, which is majority vote.  After the first day, however, that option isn’t available.

The second version is more complicated; but it can be used at any time.  One party, let’s say the Republicans, moves to change the 60-vote cloture rule to 51 votes.  The Democrats filibuster the rule-change – which means it would take 67 votes to close debate.  Republicans then go for the nuclear option – which is a point-of-order, upheld by the presiding officer, declaring that the 67-vote requirement is unconstitutional.

In 2005, it was the Republicans threatening the nuclear option to stop Democrats from blocking confirmation of George W. Bush’s judicial nominees.  In response, the Democrats said they’d shut down all Senate business.  Then-Senator Obama (D-IL) said, “I urge my Republican colleagues not to go through with changing these rules.  In the long run, it is not a good result for either party.”  Eventually, the confrontation was diffused when the Gang of 14 – seven senators from each party – agreed not to filibuster judicial nominees, except in extraordinary circumstances.  So, the Republicans never did use the nuclear option.  But eight years later, the Democrats had gained control of the Senate.  Majority leader Harry Reid (D-NV), who had previously opposed any effort to change the Senate’s rules, abruptly decided to support the nuclear option that he had argued vigorously against. 

As a result, we now have a new rule:  the minority cannot filibuster executive appointments and federal judicial nominees, except for Supreme Court nominees.  Of course, with the Republicans back in control of the Senate, the rule change backfired on Reid and the Democrats.  Not only was it an unexpected gift to the Republicans, but it also opened the door to a second use of the nuclear option, if necessary, to ensure confirmation of Trump’s Supreme Court nominees.  And that’s what will happen if the Democrats try to stop Neil Gorsuch. 

For what it’s worth, here’s my view of the matter:  The gripe against the filibuster is that it’s undemocratic because it stifles majority rule.  That misses the point.  We are a republic, not a democracy, and our Constitution is intentionally undemocratic.  The Framers were concerned about tyranny by the majority.  Recent majorities, on both sides of the aisle, have proven that those concerns are justified.  Majority parties have killed bills in committee, refused floor votes, and blocked amendments – essentially denying the minority any meaningful role.  The filibuster is a partial counterweight to those problems.

Furthermore, the Framers wrote a Constitution replete with protections that limit majority rule.  To name just a few: we have limited and enumerated federal powers, two senators from each state, the electoral college, and the Bill of Rights.  And note that the Constitution requires a 2/3 vote to propose constitutional amendments, override vetoes, approve treaties, impeach the president, and expel a congressman.  The filibuster’s supermajority requirement may be undemocratic, but that’s precisely why we have it.

Without the filibuster, we would be laboring under a federal government far larger than today’s behemoth.  Thanks to the filibuster, senators can occasionally throw a few grains of sand in the ever-grinding wheels of the regulatory and redistributive state.  Milton Friedman captured that point when he said, “I just shudder at what would happen to freedom in this country if the government were efficient.”  He was right.  The filibuster is a valuable safeguard.  We’d be better off if it were codified as part of the Constitution – especially for votes on significant expenditures and tax increases – and also for confirmation of federal judges, who have lifetime tenure on the bench.  Unless and until we establish judicial term limits, it’s little enough to insist that lifetime appointees be approved by 60 senators. 

More likely, however, the availability of the filibuster for Supreme Court nominees will be short-lived.

NYT Report on Paramilitary Drug Raids

The New York Times has a special investigative report about the militaristic drug raids that are now happening every day in the United States. 

Here is an excerpt:

As policing has militarized to fight a faltering war on drugs, few tactics have proved as dangerous as the use of forcible-entry raids to serve narcotics search warrants, which regularly introduce staggering levels of violence into missions that might be accomplished through patient stakeouts or simple knocks at the door.

Thousands of times a year, these “dynamic entry” raids exploit the element of surprise to effect seizures and arrests of neighborhood drug dealers. But they have also led time and again to avoidable deaths, gruesome injuries, demolished property, enduring trauma, blackened reputations and multimillion-dollar legal settlements at taxpayer expense, an investigation by The New York Times found.

For the most part, governments at all levels have chosen not to quantify the toll by requiring reporting on SWAT operations. But The Times’s investigation, which relied on dozens of open-record requests and thousands of pages from police and court files, found that at least 81 civilians and 13 law enforcement officers died in such raids from 2010 through 2016. Scores of others were maimed or wounded.

It’s terrific reporting that covers so many of the problems: the unnecessary violence, the dilution of constitutional safeguards, the flimsy police investigative work, the cover-ups when things go bad, and the lawsuits that will ultimately burden taxpayers.

Cato has been sounding the alarm on this trend since 1999, with the publication of “Warrior Cops.” That was followed by Radley Balko’s study, “Overkill,” and there have been countless events, media appearances, opinion articles, and book chapters since. Indeed, one of the NYT’s own reporters, Matt Apuzzo, acknowledged a few years ago that “the criticism of the so-called militarization of police has largely come from libertarian quarters for several years. They have kind of been the lone voice on this, folks like the Cato institute.” 

For related Cato scholarship, go here.

What to Look for in the Gorsuch Confirmation Hearings

The moment has arrived: this week, we finally have Supreme Court confirmation hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee. This is the culmination of a series of unusual political events that took place after Justice Antonin Scalia’s untimely death in February 2016.

Indeed, when Scalia died, President Barack Obama had almost a year left in office, so it seemed likely that he would get to select the Court’s next justice. But it was an election year—and the last time that a Senate controlled by the party not in the White House confirmed a Supreme Court nominee to a vacancy that arose during a presidential election year was 1888. Accordingly, Republicans vowed not to consider any high-court nominee until after the election. In a politically polarized nation that had reelected a Democrat to the presidency in 2012 and then gave Senate control to the GOP in 2014, they were determined to let the people have another say regarding who would get to appoint the next justice.

Nevertheless, Obama nominated Judge Merrick Garland, a seemingly uncontroversial pick designed to pressure Senate Republicans to cave. As Donald Trump became the Republican nominee and the electoral winds blew harder against the GOP, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s #NoHearingsNoVotes gambit (which I supported) seemed increasingly ill-advised. But the unlikely happened: Trump not only won the presidency, but he picked his nominee from a gold-plated list of 21 candidates that he had issued during his campaign.

Since Judge Neil Gorsuch of the Denver-based U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit was nominated on January 31, his chances of joining the high court have only improved. A recent survey showed that 91 percent of Democratic congressional staffers expect him to be confirmed, as Democratic senators have failed to find any salient items that would merit disqualification. Sure, activists will attempt to tar Gorsuch as anti-women, anti-worker, anti-this-that-and-the-other, but the mild-mannered originalist is anything but the cartoon Monopoly Man this caricature tries to paint. And the argument about how this is a #StolenSeat isn’t going anywhere because that was litigated at the election.

Court Rules the President Violated the 1965 Law with Executive Order

Last year, I put forward a statutory argument that President Trump’s proposal to ban immigrants from several majority Muslim countries was illegal because it violated a 1965 law that specifically banned discrimination against immigrants based on race, gender, nationality or place of residence or birth. On the night that the original executive order was released, I wrote an op-ed in the New York Times laying out the case again.

Now, finally, a ruling from a federal district court judge in Maryland addressed the issue, agreed with me in part, and partially stayed the executive order on this basis. This afternoon, the Trump administration appealed the ruling to the Fourth Circuit. The portion of ruling relevant to the statutory argument states:

Plaintiffs argue that by generally barring the entry of citizens of the Designated Countries, the Second Order violates Section 202(a) of the INA, codified at 8 U.S.C. 1152(a) (“1152(a)”), which provides that, with certain exceptions:

No person shall receive any preference or priority or be discriminated against in the issuance of an immigrant visa because of his race, sex, nationality, place of birth, or place of residence.

Martin Feldstein on U.S. Growth vs. Other Major Economies

Martin Feldstein has a new short paper out with some thoughts on a relatively under-researched subject: Why is Growth Better in the United States than in other Industrial Countries?

He begins:

In 2015, real GDP per capita was $56,000 in the United States. On a purchasing power basis, the real GDP per capita in the same year was only $47,000 in Germany, $41,000 in France and the United Kingdom, and just $36,000 in Italy. So the official measures of real GDP clearly point to the cumulative result of higher sustained real growth rates in the United States than in the major industrial countries of Europe and Asia.

Over the very long term, this is a truism. In order for the U.S. to be that much richer, it must have experienced faster real GDP per capita growth than comparator countries. We know from figures collated by the Maddison Project that the U.S. had around half the level of GDP per capita of the UK in the early 18th century, but by 1900 it was overtaking the UK as the richest country by income per head, and has remained in that leading position for almost all the period since.

But showing higher levels of income does not necessarily mean that the U.S. growth of GDP per capita was higher than other countries over more recent periods.

Natural Variability’s Role in Arctic Sea Ice Decline Strengthens Case for Lukewarming

Global Science Report is a feature from the Center for the Study of Science, where we highlight one or two important new items in the scientific literature or the popular media. For broader and more technical perspectives, consult our “Current Wisdom.”

A story this week that has been making the rounds in the climate-media complex finds that natural variability is responsible for perhaps as much as 50% of the summertime decrease in Arctic sea ice that has taken place over the past 30 years or so (anthropogenic climate change is the presumed factor in the remainder).

This isn’t new. The last (2013) science report from the UN’s Intergovernmental panel on climate change said:

Using climate model simulations from the NCAR CCSM4…inferred that approximately half (56%) of the observed rate of decline from 19979 to 2005 was externally (anthropogenically) forced, with the other half associated with natural internal variability.

Ten years ago, a study was conducted by a team led by Julienne Stroeve that looked at the observed rate of Arctic sea ice loss and compared it to climate model expectations. [A side note here: the loss of Arctic sea ice (which is floating ice) does not lead to sea level rise just as the melting of ice in your cocktail doesn’t lead to your glass overflowing]. What Stroeve and colleagues found was the Arctic sea ice was being lost at a far brisker pace than climate models had predicted (Figure 1).

Figure 1. Arctic sea ice extent from observations (red think line) and climate models (colored spaghetti), from Stroeve et al. (2007).