Madness!!!

President Bush has endorsed adding the former Soviet province of Georgia to NATO, a measure that seems designed to provoke the Russians without adding any net benefits to the alliance.  Georgia would bring more liabilities than assets to NATO because it is inherently indefensible.  It is nearly surrounded by Russia; its only border with NATO is a short border with eastern Turkey.  Georgia has no significant military forces of its own, and Russian troops already occupy two enclaves there.

Article V of the NATO Charter obligates all NATO governments to respond to an attack on any NATO country, increasing the probability that a minor confrontation between Georgia and Russia would lead to a larger war between NATO and Russia.  NATO should not be broadened to include countries on the Russian border unless those countries have substantial military forces and defensible borders.  For a similar reason, the earlier addition of the three Baltic countries to NATO was a mistake.  Peaceful and productive relations with Russia are more important than any value these new members bring to the United States and NATO.

President Bush was gracious in hosting the president of Georgia this week and was correct to support the major economic reforms that Georgia has initiated.  But he was wrong in endorsing NATO membership as a sort of after-dinner mint.  There are much larger issues at stake for the U.S., Europe, and Russia.  One wonders what Bush now expects to accomplish with Putin at the G-8 meeting in St. Petersburg next week.  

Technology - er, Paying Attention - Will Save Us All

With masterful dry wit, ars technica skewers a new Defense Department research project.  The idea?  Using technology to find information.

The Air Force’s Office of Scientific Research has commenced a study called “Automated Ontologically-Based Link Analysis of International Web Logs for the Timely Discovery of Relevant and Credible Information.”  In translation, that means, “We’re going to pay attention to blogs.”  Price tag: $450,000. 

Talk about government waste. I would have sold them that idea for $399,000.

Breaking News: Not All Children Are the Same

An article in this morning’s Los Angeles Times reports that delaying children’s entry into kindergarten “appears to help some, harm others or have no effect at all.”

This shouldn’t be a surprise. In fact, what would have been surprising is if all children responded to delayed kindergarten in precisely the same way. After all, no two children are exactly alike, right?

Of course. Which is why American public education works so poorly: Even though all children are different, public school districts have no choice but to educate them as if they weren’t. By their very nature, uniform systems of education must do things uniformly.

Consider reading instruction: Just like their varied responses to delayed kindergarten entry, children respond in numerous ways to different reading curricula. School districts, however, can typically teach reading using only one technique, usually either whole language, phonics, or so-called “balanced” instruction. That means that if your child would benefit most from phonics-based instruction but is in a whole language district, he’s out of luck.

Or look at discipline. Some children need rigid rules and regulations, while others need freedom to thrive. School districts, however, can’t apply different disciplinary rules to different children, so a large number of children are going to get the short end of the stick (or carrot) no matter what.

The best way to ameliorate this problem is to eliminate it: Get rid of one-size-fits-all public schools, and create a system in which “the public” does nothing more than help needy parents afford the schools that best address their children’s needs. In other words, let the market go to work. Only then will all children finally get the made-to-order education they need to succeed.

Gray Power and State Tax Competition

At my neigborhood Fourth of July block party yesterday (in Fairfax County, Virginia), a 40-year resident gave a going-away speech to the crowd. She and her husband were sick and tired of the high state and local taxes in Fairfax and had looked into alternate warm states that had more pocketbook-friendly tax regimes. They settled on a small town in North Carolina. Interestingly, she appeared to be a hard-core Democrat.

Expect to hear lots more about comparative state tax rates as tens of millions of baby boomers begin retiring in coming years. 

Negative Ads Inform Voters

Last week the New York Times roiled the upcoming U.S. Senate election in New Jersey by reporting that Repubican Thomas Kean Jr. planned to produce a film claiming that his opponent, Sen. Robert Menendez (D-NJ), was implicated in a corruption investigation twenty years ago.

Critics sometimes deplore such “negative advertising” and call for restrictions on such speech or the money that funds it. Under such a scenario, the government would gain the power to approve the content and tone of electoral advertising.

The Supreme Court, however, has never recognized “improving speech” as a legitimate reason for regulating money in politics. That’s a good thing.

The Kean film, if produced, will give New Jersey voters important information. If Kean’s claims about Menendez’s past are true, surely voters would want to know that. On the other hand, if Kean is making wild charges, the voters could also draw their own conclusions about his fitness for office.

The best solution to abuses of free speech is more speech, not government control over politics.

Pulp Non-Fiction: The Seedy Side of Monopoly Schooling

The Detroit Free Press reported recently that the city’s schools have been ordered to repay nearly a million dollars in federal Title I funding because “there are no assurances that these [funds] did not benefit an employee personally.” The money went to flat screen TVs that are nowhere to be found, anger management classes that never occurred, and half a million dollars to, uh, pass out flyers. Did I mention that the $500,000 paper route went to an ex-con in a no-bid contract?

Critics of market-based education reform claim that it would open the door to corruption. As it happens, corruption has been living happily within the public schools for some time now, raiding the icebox and stealing kids’ lunch money – not to mention the money that is supposed to go toward their education. Cato’s Neal McCluskey published a run-down of this broken-down system last year.

Hat tip: Mackinac Center for Public Policy