The United States in 2020 has been scarred by an extreme wildfire season and a viral pandemic. Fires have ravaged the Southwest, the Rockies, the Pacific Northwest, and California since April. Meantime, COVID-19 has been spreading across the country since March, infecting millions and killing hundreds of thousands of Americans, along with many others around the world. In this issue of Regulation, Dean Lueck and Jonathan Yoder discuss what can we learn about virus management from wildfire management history. Also in this issue, Sam Batkins and Ike Brannon argue that, despite the headlines, the Trump administration will likely have little lasting effect on federal regulation.

From the Cover

Health & Medicine

Spreading Like Wildfire

Economics and wildfire policy offer useful lessons for COVID-19 response.

Are We ‘Paying Twice’ for Pharmaceuticals?

The use of prizes could resolve concerns that drugmakers receive improper rents for their discoveries.

Regulatory Reform

Trump’s Regulatory Legacy: A First Draft

Despite the headlines, the Trump administration will likely have little lasting effect on federal regulation.

How Democrats Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the CRA

Both parties now embrace the Congressional Review Act to overturn each other’s regulations.

Features

Antitrust

Assessing the Revolution in Antitrust

New learning and evidence on market concentration do not justify a return to the dark ages of antitrust and regulation.

Immigration

The Costs of Closing DACA Initial Enrollments

Blocking additional Dreamers will cost the economy and government coffers

Final Word