Washington and Havana Officially Restore Diplomatic Ties

It was long overdue. After over half a century of unsuccessfully trying to bring about regime change in Cuba through isolation, President Obama announced today that Washington has reached a deal with Havana to reopen embassies on July 20th.

There was a lot of posturing in the process, particularly from Cuba. At some point, the island’s dictator even said that restoring diplomatic ties would not be possible unless, among other things the United States returns Guantanamo and pays economic reparations for 50 years of embargo. In the end, it came down to the removal of Cuba from the U.S. list of states that sponsor terrorism and an agreement about the movement of U.S. diplomatic personnel around the island.

By restoring diplomatic ties, removing Cuba from the terrorist-sponsor list, and relaxing some elements of the embargo and the travel ban, the Obama administration has gone as far as it can using its executive authority. Lifting the outstanding elements of the embargo and travel ban is a prerogative of Congress. As it is, it looks unlikely that a bill in that regard will reach Obama’s desk for the remainder of his term.

Polls show not only considerable bipartisan support for Obama’s policy toward Cuba, but also a majority of Cuban Americans favoring rapprochement. Sooner rather than later, Congress–and the Republican presidential field–will realize the futility of sticking with the status quo.

Under no circumstances should we deceive ourselves on the current nature of the Cuban regime. It remains a Stalinist dictatorship. Dissidents are still harassed and arbitrarily arrested. The much-hyped economic reforms announced by Raúl Castro eight years ago have been too timid and seem more aimed at allowing Cubans to survive in the private sector without becoming prosperous.

However, political and economic isolation failed at weakening the Castro regime. American policy actually strengthened the Cuban government by providing itself as a scapegoat for Cuba’s disastrous economic policies and as a victim of U.S. aggression, thereby rallying support from all over the world.

Despite the embargo and travel ban still remaining in place, this is a historic move by the Obama administration.