Regulatory Competition Leads to Better Policy in France

The Financial Times reports that France is deregulating and cutting taxes in hopes of competing with London in the financial services market. The article also notes that Switzerland and Germany also are trying to attract business by reducing the burden of government. Needless to say, these positive reforms would not happen if the bureaucrats in Brussels had the authority to create a continent-wide regulatory regime. Another threat to deregulation and better policy is IOSCO (the International Organization of Securities Commissions), which wants to impose one-size-fits-all regulation on all jurisdictions - particularly ones with a more laissez-faire approach:

The French government yesterday unveiled its plans to boost Paris as a financial centre, proposing a more lightly regulated market for companies and funds on the Euronext exchange. Several of the measures are closely modelled on UK structures, as the French capital seeks to make up ground lost to London. The new market segment would operate according to European Union minimum standards in terms of listing and disclosure. …Switzerland’s leading financial services companies launched their own campaign last month for tax cuts, a relaxation of immigration rules and other measures to turn their country into the world’s third largest financial centre after London and New York. Frankfurt launched its own more lightly regulated market segment two years ago… Ms Lagarde said the government had already shown serious commitment to financial services by cutting taxes, particularly for higher earners. France’s high taxation is one reason why so many young French bankers flock to London.