December 28, 2018 4:53PM

Did Rand Paul Persuade Trump to Withdraw from Syria?

In the Washington Post, Josh Rogin warns us that "Rand Paul is quietly steering U.S. foreign policy in a new direction." Indeed, the Post's overwrought headline is 

Welcome to the world of President Rand Paul

Rogin goes on:

Several U.S. officials and people who have spoken directly to Trump since his Syria decision tell me they believe that Paul’s frequent phone conversations with Trump, wholly outside the policy process, are having an outsize influence on the president’s recent foreign policy decisions. The two golf buddies certainly are sounding a lot alike recently....

Paul told CNN on Dec. 23 that he had talked to Trump about Syria and was “very proud of the president.” That night on Twitter, Trump quoted Paul as saying, “It should not be the job of America to replace regimes around the world… The generals still don’t get the mistake.”

If Paul did in fact persuade the president to withdraw U.S. troops from one of the seven military conflicts we're currently engaged in, Bravo. He tried to keep us out of the Syrian conflict back in 2013. That's not Rogin's view, though. He grumbles:

Of course, there’s nothing wrong with a senator advising the president on foreign policy. Hawks such as Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) do it all the time. But the Trump-Paul bromance is troubling because Trump may be taking Paul’s word over that of his own advisers. 

Well, presidents are allowed to choose their own advisers. But how is it "troubling" that Trump might take advice from Senator Paul, but it's fine to take advice from Senators Cotton and Graham? And by the way, check the quote above: how is a president's conversation with a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee "wholly outside the policy process"?

Of course, Paul isn't responsible for the fact that Trump is unable or unwilling to set a clear policy, implement it in an orderly manner, articulate a defense of it without using "alternative facts" and words like "suckers," and make an inspirational, presidential speech to troops in a combat zone. It's better to withdraw from unnecessary wars inarticulately than to stay in them with a 500-page report.

Rogin concludes by bemoaning "dangerous . . . isolationism [and] retreat." "Isolationism" is a term that the foreign policy establishment throws around any time anyone questions whether all seven wars are actually wise. The New York Times also uses the term, reporting that the Syrian withdrawal "has been condemned across the ideological spectrum," "with the exception of a few vocal isolationists like Senator Rand Paul." And a few realists and noninterventionists like my colleagues John Glaser and Christopher Preble. And about half the American people.