December 11, 2018 2:42PM

Farm Bill: 800 Pages from an 800‐​Pound Lobby

Congress and the White House are Republican. The latter proposed modest reforms to food stamps and farm subsidies in its budget. The House passed modest reforms to food stamps. Liberal and conservative analysts favor reforms to farm subsidies, which are actually subsidies to wealthy landowners.

Yet Congress is set to pass an $867 billion farm/food stamp bill with virtually no smaller-government reforms, and the president will probably sign it. The 800-page bill is backed by an 800-pound lobbying gorilla with two muscular arms—the farm lobby and the anti-poverty lobby.

Where does an 800-pound gorilla sit? Wherever it wants to, including on American taxpayers.

I said the bill is “appalling.” Heritage says it is a “nightmare.” NTU says it will “expand welfare to the wealthy.” R Street and AFP say it is “a huge jumble of subsidies.”

Politico says the farm bill is a “win for Democrats,” noting:  

Leaders of the House and Senate Agriculture committees rejected sweeping changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program [i.e. food stamps] that House Republicans and President Donald Trump had sought, clearing a path for bipartisan support in both chambers. The final bill also sidesteps a Senate attempt to tighten limits on subsidies for wealthier farmers.

The bill, which has an estimated price tag of $867 billion over a decade, could have a floor vote in the House as soon as Wednesday. Quick passage in the House would allow the Senate to vote on the bill later this week.

… The deal is a win for Democrats, who unanimously opposed the House plan to impose stricter work requirements on millions of participants in SNAP, formerly known as food stamps. SNAP helps nearly 40 million low-income Americans buy groceries and accounts for more than 75 percent of the farm bill's total price tag.

… Trump has repeatedly said he wanted the farm bill to include stricter SNAP work rules, but lawmakers told reporters the president is expected to sign the final deal even though it lacks those provisions.

… The final compromise doesn't cut SNAP benefits or change eligibility criteria in any significant way.

… A controversial proposal from Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) to curb how many farm managers can qualify for commodity subsidies also didn't make the cut.

… Commodity subsidies, which can cost around $5 billion to $8 billion a year and are sent out when farmers' average revenue or crop prices fall below certain levels, are expected to increase under the bill.

Dairy producers will get added protection, as well, because lawmakers decided to make it less expensive for them to enroll in support programs. House Agriculture ranking member Collin Peterson (D-Minn.), who is expected to take over the panel next year, has said the changes will make it nearly impossible for smaller dairy operations to lose money.

Federal crop insurance, which subsidizes about 60 percent of farmers' premiums and shields producers from weather-related disasters or profit losses during any one year, will continue. The program is not means-tested.