Exciting New Technological Developments

In another installment of our series on how science and technology are working to improve lives and solve problems, we sum up some exciting new developments in robotics and 3-D printing, and even news on a sonic tractor beam right out of Star Wars.

The Robots Chasing Amazon

In 2012, Amazon bought the warehouse robot maker, Kiva Systems, in order to keep the technology away from its competitors. This created a gap in demand for warehouse robots, giving Fetch Robotics and Harvest Automation a chance to enter the market. Both of these companies have created robots that follow warehouse employees around for the purpose of collecting and moving the inventory items that they take off the shelves. These robots have greatly improved efficiency and are cheaper than hiring more workers or introducing more infrastructure, such as conveyor belts. Fetch Robotics currently sells these robots for $25,000, while Harvest Automation will sell them for $15,000 or rent them for $1,000 a month beginning next year. Currently these robots are designed to work alongside warehouse employees, but Fetch Robotics has already begun working on warehouse robots that grab the items from the shelves themselves.

Robot Builder Designed for Construction Sites

Recently at ETH Zurich, a robot that is able to lay bricks in various designs was created. It is the first robot that can lay bricks without rigid design constraints, which could make construction sites much more efficient. The robot consists of a robotic arm attached to a mobile base unit and two computer systems. The first computer controls the arm, while the second generates a 3D version of the construction site, allowing it to envision its location. It is hoped that in the future, construction workers and these robots will be able to work together in order to efficiently erect various structures. ETH Zurich is also working on two other projects. One is a robot that can analyze pieces of rubble and then assemble them into a structure. The second robot uses the 3D-printing of mesh, along with the use of concrete filler, to replace older methods of using molds for making concrete pieces. A new robotic fabrication facility will hopefully open by September of 2016. 

3D-printed hip and knee joints coming to a hospital near you

A new breakthrough has occurred in the world of hip and knee surgery. Dr. Clarke has created a technique where virtual models of patient’s bodies are generated for two purposes: One being so surgeons are able to practice the procedure beforehand. The second being so precision instruments for the surgery can be made. Currently, because the size and shape of everyone’s hip and knee joints are different, surgery involves a “trial and error” procedure in order to discover the correct fitting of instruments for an individual’s joint. But Dr. Clarke’s cutting-edge technique allows surgeons to know the size and shape of the patient’s joint beforehand, which lets them use 3D-printing to create surgical instruments that perfectly fit the specific person. This technique diminishes recovery time, allows for smaller incisions, and reduces blood loss.

Star Wars style sonic tractor beam invented by scientists              

It has been portrayed in movies like Star Wars and Star Trek, but now it is a reality. Researches have created a tractor beam that can move, rotate, and suspend a four millimeter plastic bead in mid-air. It uses sixty-four miniature loud speakers that emit high frequency sound waves, which the human ear cannot detect. However, in order to lift larger objects, lower frequencies that humans can detect would have to be used, which poses an unfavorable sound problem. Other implications of this technology include performing surgical procedures inside the human body without making any incisions.