The Continuing Anti-Trade Adventures of Ted Cruz

Ted Cruz’s campaign has produced a new ad targeting Wisconsin voters in the lead up to that state’s primary election tomorrow. As images switch back and forth between farms and factories, Cruz lists off a number of generic demographics and blue collar occupations that his campaign “is for.” He also complains about international trade.


Here’s the substantive part of the ad:

We will repeal Obamacare, peel back the EPA and all the burdensome regulations that are killing small businesses and manufacturing. 

I’m going to stand up for fair trade and bring our jobs back from China. 

We will see wages going up. 

We’ll see opportunity again.

Senator Cruz doesn’t tell us what he means by “fair trade” or promote a specific trade policy. The term “fair trade” is usually used by politicians as a euphemism for “protectionism.” In the past, Cruz has noted that the value-added tax (VAT) he has proposed is “like a tariff” because it imposes a greater burden on imports. Perhaps this is what he means by “fair trade.”

In any event, some simple facts about trade might be helpful to explain the problems with Cruz’s approach. For example, nearly 60% of imports are materials and capital goods used by American companies. So, Cruz’s “fair trade” is a tax on the very same “small businesses and manufacturing” whose burdens he wants to lift. Oh, and reduced employment in America’s thriving manufacturing sector is not due primarily to trade with China.

The biggest difference between Donald Trump and Ted Cruz on trade is that Trump has been more specific. Trump has singled out specific trade deals he opposes and has promised to tax specific companies specific amounts. Also, Trump’s disdain for trade has been apparent from the beginning of his campaign, while Cruz’s rhetoric and positions have been getting gradually worse in response.

While Trump has been getting lots of attention for his anti-trade rhetoric, it’s worth remembering that other candidates are not offering better policy proposals. They are simply less sensational in how they present the same flawed message.