populism

Seven Reforms to Confront the Populist Wave in America and Europe

Donald Trump keeps winning Republican Party primaries. He could be America’s next president. It’s a sobering thought.

But Trump is not alone. Europe is filled with populist parties, old and new.

It’s too simple to decry a proto-fascist wave, as feared by some alarmists. In fact, most of his Republican competitors were far more aggressive and irresponsible on foreign policy than Trump. Normal folks simply are tired of being viewed as problems to be solved rather than citizens to be engaged.

In the U.S. it doesn’t much matter who people vote for. Government will expand. New regulations will be issued. More tax dollars will be spent. Additional wars will be started. The only certainty is that the views of those who vote will be ignored. Much the same governing consensus dominates Europe.

At the same time, the governing class protects itself. The response of this ruling class to public challenge only increases popular anger and frustration.

Argentina’s Point of No Return

The most important development this week in Latin America is the decision of the Argentine government to seize control of Yacimientos Petrolíferos Fiscales (YPF), the country’s largest oil company. On Monday, President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner announced the expropriation of the controlling stake of YPF that is owned by the Spanish company Repsol.

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