hhs

Trump Plan For Pharmaceutical Importation A Small Step In The Right Direction

On July 31 Secretary of Health and Humans Services Alex Azar announced a proposal that would allow US pharmacies, distributors, and states to import drugs from Canada that are sold there by US drug makers at prices well below the prices for which they are sold in the U.S. US pharmaceutical companies sell many of their products at much lower prices demanded by Canada’s central health ministry called Health Canada.

14 Questions for Trump HHS Nominee Alex Azar

President Trump has nominated Alex Azar to be the next Secretary of Health and Human Services. Azar will appear tomorrow for questioning before (and sermonizing by) members of the Senate’s Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee.

Here are 14 questions I would ask Azar at his confirmation hearings.

Obamacare’s Low Enrollment Numbers Also Show Why Exchange Coverage Will Get Worse

The Obama administration has released the numbers from the 2016 open enrollment period for Obamacare’s health insurance exchanges. The Congressional Budget Office had already downgraded its enrollment projection for 2016 from 21 million to 13 million. The news is actually just slightly worse: only 12.7 million enrollments, a number that is likely to shrink over the course of the year. Naturally, the administration declared success because enrollments exceeded the 10 million it had predicted back in October (thereby confirming speculation it had deliberately low-balled that prediction so it could later declare victory in spite of what it knew would be terrible enrollment numbers). Yet most observers overlooked what may be the worst news of all: evidence suggesting significant adverse selection in the Exchanges.

The administration reported that 70% of those who re-enrolled for 2016 shopped for a better plan, while 43% switched plans. The administration spun this as a positive, as evidence that Obamacare is expanding choice.

In reality, those numbers mean the vast majority of enrollees were dissatisfied enough with their Obamacare coverage to look for a better option , and a near-majority were so dissatisfied with their premiums or their coverage that they switched to what they hope will be a better plan. Most importantly, such widespread plan-switching is strong evidence of the type of adverse selection that is already eroding Obamacare’s promise to the sick , and could cause the exchanges to collapse.

Do Conservatives Only Oppose Big-Government Health Care Schemes When Proposed by Democrats?

Conservatives outright reject the idea that big-government gun-control schemes would reduce mass shootings like the recent murders committed at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs. So why do so many conservatives seem to believe a big-government mental-health-care scheme, like the bill sponsored by psychologist and congressman Tim Murphy (R-PA), would be any more effective?

Murphy’s bill would reorganize and expand the federal government’s involvement in mental-health care. It would create a new Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It would create an Interagency Serious Mental Illness Coordinating Committee. It would encourage telepsychiatry–by subsidizing it. It would expand Medicare and Medicaid subsidies for mental-health goods and services. It would leverage federal grants to coerce control how states treat mental-health patients suspected of being a threat to others. It would do other things.

Conservatives have lauded the bill and demonized its opponents. In October, National Review editorialized basically that Murphy’s bill would manage mental-health treatment from Washington better than Washington has ever managed mental-health treatment before.  Last week, The Wall Street Journal editorialized that opponents, including some Republicans, “object to involuntary commitment for the mentally ill, despite overwhelming evidence of the risks to society and the sick.” The Journal neglected either to recognize that involuntary commitment is a dangerous power for the government to wield, one with both benefits and costs, or to offer evidence that the benefits to society and the sick of broader involuntary commitment would exceed those costs.

HHS Expects ACA Exchange Enrollment to Stagnate in 2016

For the second year in a row, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) estimates that enrollment in the health insurance exchanges will come in far below earlier projections from the Congressional Budget Office (CBO).

According to the research brief released yesterday, HHS estimates that effectuated enrollment, or enrolled and paying premiums, will be in the range of 9.4 to 11.4 million at the end of 2016. In a conference call with reporters HHS Secretary Burwell said she believes “10 million is a strong and realistic goal… our target assumes something that is probably pretty challenging, which is that more than one out of every four of the eligible uninsured will select plans.” Effectuated enrollment of 10 million for 2016 would be an increase of only 900,000 over the department’s estimate for this year. The department now projects exchange enrollment to stagnate in the same year CBO estimated that average effectuated enrollment would almost double to 21 million. Part of this is due to a slower than expected shift from employer-sponsored insurance, but also due to difficulties in reaching some segments of the uninsured population.

HHS Offers to Pay Six Years of Operating Costs for Some States’ ObamaCare Exchanges

That’s my read of this.

ObamaCare gives HHS the authority to make unlimited grants to help states create Exchanges. But that authority expires on December 31, 2014. HHS just issued an announcement that they will issue grants right up to midnight on December 31—and that some of those grants will be so big that they will last for five years:

Q4: What is the last day that a State can spend its award?

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