Getting Out and Moving On: The Second Gulf War and Its Aftermath

Conference
June 10, 2003
9:00AM to 1:30PM
Auditorium/1st floor/Wintergarden
Featuring Christopher Preble, Director of Foreign Policy Studies; John Hulsman, Research Fellow, Davis Institute for International Policy Studies; Joshua Muravchik, Resident Scholar, American Enterprise Institute; Christopher Layne, Visiting Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies, Cato Institute; Doug Bandow, Senior Fellow, Cato Institute; Leon Hadar, Research Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies, Cato Institute; Michael O’Hanlon, Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution; John Zogby, President and CEO, Zogby International; and Alan Tonelson, Research Fellow, U.S. Business and Industrial Council Educational Foundation.

Now that “major combat operations” in Iraq have come to an end, the United States has turned its attention to the post-war environment in Iraq and beyond. American troops are being withdrawn from Saudi Arabia, but many have been shifted to other Persian Gulf states; meanwhile, thousands of troops remain in Iraq. What should be the long-term U.S. strategy in the region? Does the toppling of Saddam Hussein’s brutal regime improve the prospects for peace? How might the security situation change in the coming weeks and months? Please join experts for two timely discussions of these issues.

This conference is free of charge. Registrations must be received by 12:00 noon on Monday, June 9, 2003.

  Panel 1: Getting Out: Competing Visions for Post-War Iraq
9:30 — 10:45 a.m. Christopher Preble
Director of Foreign Policy Studies, Cato Institute

John Hulsman
Research Fellow, Davis Institute for International Policy Studies, Heritage Foundation

Joshua Muravchik
Resident Scholar, American Enterprise Institute

Christopher Layne
Visiting Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies, Cato Institute

Although George W. Bush campaigned against Clinton-era nation building, the Bush administration now finds itself engaged in the second such operation in the last two years. Given the limited success in Afghanistan, what can we expect for Iraq? The U.S. military is heavily involved in the rebuilding effort, but many Iraqis resent their presence. How long will the American troops remain in Iraq? What (else) should they be called upon to do? What can policymakers do to avoid a repeat of nation-building debacles in Bosnia, Kosovo, Haiti, and Somalia?

10:45 — 11:00 a.m. Break

  Panel 2: Moving On: The Middle East after Saddam
11:00 a.m — 12:30 p.m. Doug Bandow
Senior Fellow, Cato Institute

Leon Hadar
Research Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies, Cato Institute

Michael O’Hanlon
Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution

John Zogby
President and CEO, Zogby International

Alan Tonelson
Research Fellow, U.S. Business and Industrial Council Educational Foundation

American policymakers began discussing the future of the Middle East even before American and British forces entered Iraq. Now that Saddam Hussein’s regime has disappeared, the United States is restructuring its military presence in the region. How will a continued military presence affect U.S. policy in the Middle East? How does the public view American policies in the region? Does victory in Iraq facilitate progress in other areas, including democratic reform in autocratic Arab states and the Road Map for Peace between Israelis and Palestinians?

12:30 p.m. Luncheon — Wintergarden