Gimme that Ol’ Time Science…

Just had a nice chat with Brandon Weim, who’s writing a story on the evolution / creationism school wars for Wired magazine. It seems that eight Florida school districts (and in Florida, each district comprises an entire county) have passed resolutions calling for alternatives to evolutionary theory to be taught in biology classes. Brandon fears that:

If Florida opts for evolution-unfriendly textbooks and is followed by neighboring Texas – also undergoing its own curriculum revision – then other states, looking for less-expensive texts, may buy those same books. Much of an entire generation could be raised to think of evolution as a theory with no more grounding in reality than intelligent design.

The thing is… that’s already true. As a Gallup poll reported in 2004, only a third of Americans think that evolution is a theory well-supported by scientific evidence (Frank Newport, “Third of Americans Say Evidence has Supported Darwin’s Evolution Theory,” Gallup Poll News Service, 19 November, 2004).

And this is true, remember, generations after the scientific explanation of the origin of species became the only one legally permitted in public school biology classes around the country. As I’ve said before, we’ve already tried the “You evolved, Dammit!” approach for a protracted period of time, and it has failed.

Scientists pride themselves on being driven by the evidence rather than personal dogma. Well, here’s your chance, guys: Dump the failed government-mandated-curriculum approach and start campaigning for unfettered parental choice and a competitive education marketplace. Free schools to teach science properly if they so desire, and quit fooling yourselves into imagining that you can force the rest of the public to understand science by having government ram it down their throats. Make science humble, exciting, and welcoming again, in the vein of Carl Sagan and Jacob Bronowski, instead of calling our religious fellow citizens rubes or worse, and treating them like recalcitrant children.

And as for the fear that educational freedom would lead old time religion to eclipse science, consider that the Netherlands has had universal public and private school choice for a century, including religious schools, and has become one of the most secular nations in the world. Another datum for the science crowd to stick in their thinking caps….

Padilla Gets 17 Years

Jose Padilla received a 17-year prison sentence today.  Padilla’s criminal trial and sentence were fairly straightforward.  It was Padilla’s imprisonment in a military brig between 2002 and 2005 that raised profoundly important questions concerning the power of the presidency.  Can the president lock up any person in the world and then deny that person access to family, defense counsel, and civilian court review?  And what about the use of “harsh conditions” and “environmental stresses”?  Can such techniques be employed against anyone once the president gives an order?  Those legal questions remain unsettled even today.  By abruptly moving Padilla from the military brig and into the ordinary criminal justice system, the Bush administration was able to forestall Supreme Court review of the president’s military powers.

For additional background, go here, here, and here.

Freudian Slip by the WaPo?

A telling penultimate sentence in an article Friday in the Washington Post (online) about proposed changes (and none of them good) to U.S. sugar policy.

But the top Senate Republican in the negotiations, Saxby Chambliss (Ga.), represents a major Savannah refinery that could be hurt by the proposed agreement, sources said. (emphasis mine)

And here I was thinking that Sen. Chambliss represents the state of Georgia.

Leave Them Teams Alone

Nick Gillespie and Matt Welch have a great article in Sunday’s Washington Post on the absurdity of Congress demanding that Major League Baseball do something about steroids right now, or else. They point out that, in the first place, “Major League Baseball, along with other sports leagues and private-sector ventures, simply should not be required to submit their business plans – much less blood and urine samples – to Congress or any other government body.” And in the second place, steroids just aren’t that big a deal, much as Congress wants them to be.

Alas, Reason’s editors do trip up on one point. They write that baseball’s exemption from federal antitrust legislation should be repealed. Why? Because it “has caused more harm than good by allowing owners to collude against players and prospective competitor leagues and by allowing cartel arrangements and restraints on trade unimaginable in other industries.”

Aside from the general problems with antitrust law, the notion that baseball owners “collude” in “cartel arrangements and restraints on trade” reflects a misunderstanding of the organization of a sports league. The different teams in Major League Baseball are not competitors like Coke and Pepsi. They’re not even quite like McDonald’s franchisees, who clearly don’t compete in the way different companies do. Rather, the economic unit is MLB, which is in the business of providing baseball games for entertainment. The competition on the field is real, but the teams are not actually economic competitors. As the Supreme Court ruled in a case involving the NFL:

The NFL owners are joint venturers who produce a product, professional football, which competes with other sports and other forms of entertainment in the entertainment marketplace. Although individual NFL teams compete on the playing field, they rarely compete in the marketplace… . The league competes as a unit against other forms of entertainment.

Gillespie and Welch are more right than they know. Congress should stay entirely out of baseball’s business, including by not siccing antitrust regulators on a single economic unit often misunderstood as 30 competing businesses.

Escaping Ireland’s High Personal Tax Rates

While Ireland has a very attractive 12.5 percent corporate tax, the tax treatment of individuals is much less benign. The top tax rate on personal income is 42 percent, and capital gains are hit with a 20 percent levy. As a result, more than 3,000 of Ireland’s most productive people have become non-residents for tax purposes, including at least half of the nation’s wealthiest citizens. The Sunday Business Post reports:

Although Ireland’s tax rates are relatively low by international standards, an increasing number of high-net-worth individuals are deciding to leave the country of their birth and move to places with more welcoming and forgiving tax regimes. …New figures prepared by the Revenue Commissioners finally reveal just how many tax exiles have decamped Ireland for other jurisdictions. According to new figures obtained by The Sunday Business Post, there are 19 high-net-worth individuals who are Irish domiciled but who are legally non-resident for tax purposes. The figures, from the Department of Finance, only includes individuals whose net worth (their assets less their liabilities) is valued at more than €50 million. …Of the top 20 individuals on the Irish Rich List, at least half are tax resident outside Ireland. John Magnier and JP McManus, the Irish horseracing tycoons, are both based in Geneva, as is Hugh Mackeown, the chairman of the Musgrave Group, the €4.6 billion Cork retail giant. Michael Smurfit, the packaging magnate, is the honorary Irish consul to Monaco, while dancer Michael Flatley also pays his tax in the principality. Billionaire financier Dermot Desmond officially resides in Gibraltar. …The 19 names on the list are just the top of the tax exile iceberg, however. According to the Department of Finance, it only includes individuals who filed an annual return in Ireland for the 2005 financial year. …It is not just the high rollers who are relocating to tax-efficient economies. According to the Revenue Commissioners, Ireland now has more than 3,000 tax exiles who claim non-residency. Many of these individuals are not in the top 250, but have serious wealth nonetheless.

European Politicians Want China to Adopt a Welfare State

Guided by the mercantilist superstition that imports somehow are bad, politicians in Europe are trying to figure out how to reduce the amount of Chinese goods available to European consumers. To their credit (to offer a back-handed compliment), the policies they are advocating - for China to adopt European-style levels of income redistribution - would be very effective. High tax rates and excessive levels of government spending would hamstring China’s economy. The EU Observer reports on European efforts to export bad policy:

EU top officials along with employment and social affairs commissioner Vladimir Spidla on Friday went to Beijing to advocate improvement of social welfare and worker protection. … “If we talk to them about health and safety at work, about social security and they see themselves that there is a necessity to change things in order to have a sustainable economy in the long-term that will also decrease possibilities for social dumping,” said Mr Spidla, according to AFP. ”If they decide to copy the European pension model, it means they consider it to be the best,” he continued. Social dumping – when countries with weak labour and safety standards export cheap goods to a state with more rigorous legislation and protection – is a strong point of contention between Brussels and Beijing. …Mr Spidla said he hoped the EU’s dialogue would “help China develop modern systems of social security.”