Featured Events

July 23

Going for Broke: Deficits, Debt and the Entitlement Crisis

America’s growing national debt, now surpassing $18 trillion dollars, has dropped out of the headlines recently, but that doesn’t mean the problem has gone away. Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid alone account for 47 percent of federal spending today, a portion that will only grow larger in the future, reaching well over $26 trillion in just 10 years. Furthermore, if you fold in the unfunded liabilities of Social Security and Medicare our real indebtedness exceeds $90.5 trillion.

To avoid the pressing budgetary disaster, Democrats and Republicans must come together and reform these entitlement programs. Join us for an in-depth look at the obstacles and the potential solutions to the implications of sky-high national debt and the future that doing nothing portends.

July 23

Debate: Libertarianism vs. Conservatism

Debate: Libertarianism vs. Conservatism

Libertarians and conservatives both claim to be advocates of individual liberty, limited government, and free markets. Sometimes these shared values lead libertarians and conservatives to similar conclusions about public policy. As a result, American political discourse often conflates libertarianism with conservatism, and proponents of “fusionism” see libertarians and conservatives as natural political allies.

However, the differences between the two political philosophies are at least as significant as the similarities. On matters such as national security and foreign policy, immigration, drugs, marriage, and the role of religion and morality in public policy, libertarians and conservatives clash with one another.

With the recent ascendance of many longstanding libertarian concerns—such as the surveillance state and militarized policing—into mainstream political discourse, we invite you to a timely debate about the two philosophies and their associated policy implications. Interns from the Heritage Foundation and the Cato Institute will go head-to-head to answer the question: Is libertarianism or conservatism the superior political philosophy?

Follow the conversation on Twitter using #LvCdebate.

October 2

Fifty Years after Reform: The Successes, Failures, and the Lessons from the Immigration Act of 1965

On October 3rd, 1965, President Lyndon Baines Johnson signed the Immigration Act of 1965 into law. Widely viewed as a component of the Civil Rights Movement, the 1965 Act liberalized immigration and replaced the last eugenics-inspired portions of the Immigration Act of 1924. For the first time in generations, immigrants from Western Europe were not given legal preference over those from Asia and the rest of the developing world.

This special conference, commemorating the passage of this landmark law 50 years ago, will bring together leading researchers, journalists, and policymakers to examine the effects of the law’s legal reforms and how they can help guide Americans in reforming our immigration system today. Major topics that will be covered include:

  • How the Immigration Act of 1965 affected the demographics and economy of the United States
  • Lessons learned from the 1965 Act since its implementation
  • How these lessons inform discussions of immigration reform in the 21st century

Please join our distinguished speakers on Friday, October 2, to discuss these and related issues.

Further details – including panel times, topic details, and additional speakers—will be posted soon.

Past Events

July 23

Debate: Libertarianism vs. Conservatism

Debate: Libertarianism vs. Conservatism

Featuring Cato Institute Interns; and Heritage Foundation Interns; with an introduction by Mark Houser, Student Programs Coordinator, Cato Institute; moderated by Christopher Bedford, Senior Editor, Daily Caller.

July 23

The End of Doom: Environmental Renewal in the Twenty-First Century

The End of Doom: Environmental Renewal in the Twenty-First Century

Featuring the author Ronald Bailey, Science Correspondent, Reason magazine; with comments by Indur M. Goklany, Author, The Improving State of the World: Why We’re Living Longer, Healthier, More Comfortable Lives on a Cleaner Planet (Cato Institute, 2007); moderated by Marian L. Tupy Senior Policy Analyst, Center for Global Liberty and Prosperity, Cato Institute.