Featured Events

May 22

Lessons from Baltimore

Lessons from Baltimore

The death of Freddie Gray while in police custody has started a wide-ranging debate about policing and poverty in American cities. Does Congress need to spend more money on jobs programs and police body cameras? Should the Department of Justice sue the City of Baltimore for a pattern and practice of civil rights violations? Are better policy options available? Please join us for a discussion of these questions.

May 28

Removing Barriers to Online Medical Care

In the United States and around the world, medical treatment has traditionally been segregated along state lines. Recently, new technology has made the provision of medical care online (telemedicine) a possibility, and consumers could benefit greatly from this development. However, state and national regulations often interfere with online medical care when it crosses borders. Can these regulations be adjusted to allow interstate and international trade? What policy concerns might arise in relation to online medical services that might require continued government involvement? Are there constitutional issues at stake? For example, do government restrictions on doctors offering medical advice online constitute an abridgement of free speech? Join us for a discussion of these issues.

June 18

Millennials and U.S. Foreign Policy

The Millennial Generation, those roughly 87 million men and women born between 1980 and 1997, now represent one-quarter of the U.S. population. With those on the leading edge of Millennials now hitting their mid-thirties, this cohort is becoming increasingly influential. A new study from the Cato Institute finds that the end of the Cold War, 9/11, and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have imprinted Millennials with a distinct pattern of foreign policy attitudes. Millennials perceive the world to be significantly less threatening than do their elders and are more likely than earlier generations to support international cooperation than the unilateral use of military force. They may also have a permanent case of an “Iraq Aversion.”

In this special Cato policy forum, the authors, George Mason University scholars A. Trevor Thrall and Erik Goepner, will present their findings, followed by a lively discussion on the impact that the Millennial Generation may have on U.S. foreign policy and domestic politics.

Past Events

May 27

Proven Strategies to Restrain Spending: An International Perspective

Featuring Daniel Freihofer, Minister-Counselor, Head of Economic and Financial Affairs, Swiss Embassy; Clement Leung, Hong Kong’s Commissioner to the United States; and Jonathan Williams, Vice President, Center for State Fiscal Reform, ALEC; moderated by Daniel J. Mitchell, Senior Fellow, Cato Institute.

May 26

The Global Village Myth: Distance, War, and the Limits of Power

The Global Village Myth: Distance, War, and the Limits of Power

Featuring the author Patrick Porter, Academic Director, Strategy and Security Institute, University of Exeter; with comments by Zack Beauchamp, World Correspondent, Vox.com; and Austin Long, Assistant Professor, School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University; moderated by Justin Logan, Director of Foreign Policy Studies, Cato Institute.

May 22

Lessons from Baltimore

Lessons from Baltimore

Featuring Tim Lynch, Director, Project on Criminal Justice, Cato Institute; Michael Tanner, Senior Fellow, Cato Institute; and Matthew Feeney, Policy Analyst, Cato Institute; moderated by Peter Russo, Director, Congressional Affairs, Cato Institute.

May 20

The State of Freedom in the UK

The State of Freedom in the UK

Featuring Iain Murray, Vice President for Strategy, Competitive Enterprise Institute; Tom Clougherty, Editorial Director, Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives, Cato Institute; and Mark Littlewood, Director General, Institute of Economic Affairs; moderated by Matthew Feeney, Policy Analyst, Cato Institute.