Topic: Tax and Budget Policy

British Tories Bungle Tax Cut Message

The Conservatives in the United Kingdom have been lost in the wilderness ever since the Thatcher years, and recent efforts to recapture the tax issue illustrate the Party’s incompetence. As reported by the BBC, a working group has proposed some decent tax reforms, including an attack on Britain’s death tax. The head of the group even made a pro-growth argument for the reform, but the Party’s Shadow Chancellor then confuses the message by stating that any tax cuts must be financed by tax increases (the Tories, like American Republicans, are unwilling to control the size of government):

A Conservative government should abolish inheritance tax because it penalises too many middle-income families, a policy group recommends. …Led by former Cabinet minister John Redwood, the Competitive Challenge working group says the government has introduced many “stealth taxes” since Labour came to power 10 years ago. …Mr Redwood told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme his proposals would not require cuts in public services because they would help the economy grow. …”Any reductions in specific taxes will have to be balanced by tax increases elsewhere, most notably green taxes,” [Shadow Chancellor George Osborne] added.

The Labour Party instantly seized on the mistake. As noted in the Guardian, the Tories are now being criticized for supporting “crippling” tax hikes:

A bitter war of words has broken out over Tory proposals for £21 billion in targeted tax cuts. Labour warned that the plans, put forward by former Cabinet minister John Redwood, would require “crippling” increases in fuel duty and other charges for homeowners, businesses, holidaymakers and motorists.

Making $600 Toilet Seats Seem Like a Bargain

Like other parts of government, the Pentagon is famous for wasting money, but a recent Bloomberg report makes $600 toilet seats seem like a good deal from the discount bin at Wal-Mart:

A small South Carolina parts supplier collected about $20.5 million over six years from the Pentagon for fraudulent shipping costs, including $998,798 for sending two 19-cent washers to an Army base in Texas, U.S. officials said. The company also billed and was paid $455,009 to ship three machine screws costing $1.31 each to Marines in Habbaniyah, Iraq, and $293,451 to ship an 89-cent split washer to Patrick Air Force Base in Cape Canaveral, Florida, Pentagon records show. …The scheme unraveled in September after a purchasing agent noticed a bill for shipping two more 19-cent washers: $969,000. That order was rejected and a review turned up the $998,798 payment earlier that month for shipping two 19-cent washers to
Fort Bliss, Texas, Stroot said.

NR Condemns Fair Tax Proposal

In a move that is sure to generate feedback, National Review is urging Republican candidates not to support the Fair Tax. The editorial is somewhat disconcerting since NR should be happy that at least some Republicans are talking about free-market ideas. The same logic could be used, after all, to argue that Republicans should not support Social Security reform or advocate the elimination of the Department of Education.

I’ve always thought the flat tax is a politically better way of getting to a system that taxes economic activity only one time and at one low rate (see here for more information), so I don’t have a dog in the Fair Tax fight. But I am nonetheless disappointed that the flagship publication of the conservative movement is discouraging GOPers from bold proposals:

The tax code needs major reform to become fairer, simpler, and more efficient. The Fair Tax is one instantiation of those goals, but its political impracticality makes it fatally flawed. If conservatives force a choice between a Fair Tax and no tax reform at all, the latter is what they are likely to get.

…The great, undeniably attractive selling point of the Fair Tax is that it would allow the country to dispense with the IRS. But the sad truth is that if the federal government is going to collect as much money as it currently does — which the Fair Taxers say their system would — its methods of tax collection will inevitably be intrusive. …[E]very country that has ever tried to impose retail sales taxes this high has quickly moved to a Value Added Tax levied at every stage of production. Consumers rarely see or keep track of these taxes, and they seem to be fairly easy for governments to raise.

…A candidate who ran on the national sales tax would be able to run on nothing else. He would have to spend all of his time defending the idea. Off the top of our heads, we can think of three devastating lines of attack an opponent could use in television ads. One ad could argue that getting rid of the mortgage deduction would send home prices into free fall (something that voters are going to find especially worrisome now). Another could ask why senior citizens, having paid taxes all their lives as they made income, should have to spend their retirements paying taxes on everything they use that money to buy. A third could simply ask voters if they look forward to paying a brand new tax.
There are answers to each attack. But no Republican candidate, especially in the daunting environment of 2008, is going to want to have to make them. Republicans cannot win a national election without the tax issue. If they ran on the national sales tax, Republicans would be taking one of their natural strengths and making it into a liability.

Siding with Governments over People, Pope Criticizes Tax Havens

It is rather disappointing that so many religious figures think that compassion should be a function of the state and that bigger government is good for the less fortunate. This approach not only undermines personal responsibility, but it also is anti-empirical because of the ever-growing body of evidence showing that high tax rates and excessive spending hinder growth and thus make it harder for poor people to climb the economic ladder.

Notwithstanding this real-world evidence, the UK-based Times reports that the Pope is about to attack tax havens as part of broader call for more redistribution. Not surprisingly, Italy’s Prime Minster is delighted that his nation’s taxpayers are being told to behave like sheep:

In his second encyclical – the most authoritative statement a pope can issue – the pontiff will denounce the use of “tax havens” and offshore bank accounts by wealthy individuals, since this reduces tax revenues for the benefit of society as a whole. …In it the pontiff focused on “those peoples who are striving to escape from hunger, misery, endemic diseases and ignorance and are looking for a wider share in the benefits of civilisation”. He called on the West to promote an equitable world economic system based on social justice rather than profit. …[Italian Prime Minister] Mr Prodi asked, adding: “If memory serves, St Paul exhorted the faithful to obey authority.”

IMF Wants Higher Taxes in Japan

The International Monetary Fund is urging higher taxes in Japan, though this is not exactly newsworthy since the IMF routinely endorses higher taxes in its country reports (Article IV consultations). To be fair, the IMF does say that it would be a good idea to control spending. And the international bureaucracy wants taxes to be raised in a less-destructive manner. Nonetheless, the notion that Japan will be more prosperous with a higher tax burden (which would be used to finance a bigger government) is rather fanciful. Tax-news.com reports:

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) last week published the conclusions reached by its assessment team during the recently completed Article IV consultation with Japan. …The Article IV report continued: “Most Directors considered that given the size of the task at hand, additional revenue measures will be needed, including for base broadening. They indicated that revenue measures could be best identified in the context of a broad reform of the tax system that addresses the challenges posed by Japan’s aging society and globalization. Among possible measures, increasing the consumption tax has the benefit of being less detrimental to growth and equitable across generations. Some Directors, however, viewed the authorities’ focus on expenditure adjustments as broadly appropriate at this juncture.”

This story, which is so similar to hundreds of other reports on IMF-endorsed tax hikes, raises an interesting question: Does anybody know if the IMF has ever recommended that a country reduce its tax burden?

Bush: The Biggest Taxer in World History

The Treasury Department reported Friday that federal revenues reached $2.12 trillion ($2,120,000,000,0000) for the first ten months of fiscal year 2007. In both current and inflation-adjusted dollars, that puts the federal government on course for the most revenue it’s ever collected in a year. Indeed, it’s the most revenue any government in the history of the world has ever collected. And yet it’s not enough to satisfy the voracious appetites of the spenders in Congress and the administration. Spending was $2.27 trillion for the same ten months.

It seems that the deficit problem in Washington is not a result of insufficient tax revenue but rather the inexorable growth of spending on everything from earmarks to entitlements to war.

To be sure, the U.S. economy is the largest national economy in history, and that’s the main reason for record tax levels. And tax revenues are not at their peak in terms of percentage of GDP–though they’re getting close. Earlier in the year OMB estimated that revenues as a percentage of GDP would reach 18.5 percent in 2007. But as of a month ago that figure had reached 18.8 percent, approaching the levels that typically produce popular demand for relief. But as spending interests become stronger and more widespread in Washington, popular demand for lower taxes faces more resistance. It seems safe to conclude that George W. Bush will go down in history as the biggest taxer and the biggest spender ever.

The More You Tax, the Less You Get

An article in USA Today notes that big tax hikes on tobacco have dramatically reduced consumption of cigarettes. This is hardly surprising. Indeed, politicians openly state that they want higher tobacco taxes to discourage smoking, and their economic analysis is correct (even if their nanny-state impulses are not).

It is frustrating, though, that the same politicians quickly forget economic analysis when the debate shifts to taxes on work, saving, investment, and entrepreneurship. But just as tobacco consumption fell when taxes rose, it is inevitable that there will be less productive activity if statists in Congress follow through on plans to hike tax rates on capital gains and corporate income:

As Congress weighs the biggest federal cigarette tax hike in history, a
USA TODAY analysis finds that higher state taxes on smokers have produced sharp declines in consumption. The amount of decline in smoking is directly tied to the size of the tax increase, the analysis shows. Cigarette sales fell 18% in North Carolina last year after the tax was raised in two steps to 35 cents from a nickel. The tobacco-growing state resisted higher cigarette taxes until 2005.

Elsewhere: Connecticut has increased its tax to $1.51 from 50 cents per pack in 2002. Since then, per capita consumption of cigarettes has fallen 37%.
New Jersey raised its tax to $2.40 from 80 cents in 2002. Smoking has dropped 35%.

…Thomas Briant, executive director of the National Association of Tobacco Outlets, agrees that consumption will fall about 6% if a $1 federal tax is imposed but says the high tax will have negative effects. State governments will suffer a sharp decline in revenue, and black-market sales and thefts will increase to avoid the draconian tax, he says.