Technologies Converge and Power Diffuses: The Evolution of Small, Smart, and Cheap Weapons

The convergence of new and improving technologies is creating a massive increase in capabilities available to smaller and smaller political entities — extending even to the individual. In a new study, T. X. Hammes argues that this new diffusion of power has major implications for the conduct of warfare and national strategy.

Not-So-Smart Sanctions

Because the high costs of Western sanctions against Russia cannot be justified by their limited impact, the United States would be better off trying a policy with fewer downsides, and with greater odds of success.

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Confronting “Isolationism”

Isolationism

Some interventionists have characterized Cato’s views as “isolationist,” but that is inaccurate. In fact, Cato scholars argue that the United States should be an example of the principles of liberty, democracy, and human rights, not their armed vindicator abroad. This page includes several articles by Cato scholars as well as a few by outside experts showing that the “isolationist” slur is inappropriate.

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To encourage people everywhere to better understand and appreciate the principles of government that are set forth in America’s founding documents, the Cato Institute published this pocket-size edition.

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A Dangerous World? Threat Perception And U.S. National Security

A Dangerous World? Threat Perception And U.S. National Security

In 2012, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey contended that “we are living in the most dangerous time in my lifetime, right now.” In 2013, he was more assertive, stating that the world is “more dangerous than it has ever been.” Is this accurate? In this new book, experts on international security assess, and put in context, the supposed dangers to American security. The authors examine the most frequently referenced threats, including wars between nations and civil wars within nations, and discuss the impact of rising nations, weapons proliferation, general unrest, transnational crime, and state failures.