Topic: Tax and Budget Policy

Is Benign Neglect the Best Immigration Policy?

Writing in the Wall Street Journal, a professor from the University of California, San Diego, argues that an expanded guest worker program might be less desirable than the status quo. Given the likelihood that politicians and bureaucrats will sabotage even a good idea with needless regulation and red tape, this is a compelling argument:

…from a purely economic perspective, illegal immigration is arguably preferable to legal immigration. …the illegal route is for the moment vastly more efficient than the cumbersome legal system. Illegal immigration responds to economic signals in ways that legal immigration does not. Illegal migrants tend to arrive in larger numbers when the U.S. economy is booming and move to regions where job growth is strong. Legal immigration, in contrast, is subject to bureaucratic delays, which tend to disassociate legal inflows from U.S. labor-market conditions. The lengthy visa application process requires employers to plan their hiring far in advance. Once here, guest workers cannot easily move between jobs, limiting their benefit to the U.S. economy.

French Presidential Candidate Calls for 25 Percent Corporate Tax Rate

It is always easy to make fun of the French for their hopeless infatuation with redistribution, intervention, and other statist policies. So it is rather embarrassing that France (33 percent) currently has a significantly lower corporate tax rate than the United States (about 40 percent, if state taxes are included). Imagine, then, how humiliating it will be if Nicolas Sarkozy wins the French presidency and follows through on his proposal to lower France’s corporate rate to 25 percent. To be sure, the impetus for a lower corporate rate is tax competition rather than a new-found appreciation for market forces. And even Sarkozy’s call for a lower corporate tax rate does not mean he has embraced the foreign concept of “laissez-faire.” As Tax-news.com reports, companies would have to jump through numerous hoops to benefit from the lower tax rate:

In an interview with French business daily La Tribune, Xavier Bertrand, a spokesman for the centre-right presidential candidate, said that Sarkozy wants to lower the rate of France’s corporate tax to 25%, bringing the tax down to about the average rate in the European Union. However, unlike France’s European partners, Sarkozy is keen to link a cut in corporate tax to a series of governance criteria, and companies would have to demonstrate that their employment, wage and investment strategies were “synchronised”. …Sarkozy fears that with key European competitors having recently announced corporate tax cuts, including Germany, Spain and the UK, France risks becoming increasingly unattractive as a place to do business and cannot afford to do nothing. Under plans agreed by Germany’s coalition government, the effective corporate tax burden there will fall to below 30% from almost 40% in January 2008, while the UK’s Chancellor of the Exchequer Gordon Brown announced a 2% cut in corporate tax in his recent budget speech. The old EU15 also continue to face growing tax competition from the new EU entrants in Central and Eastern Europe, such as the Czech Republic, where the government has announced proposals for a 15% flat tax on personal income and a 5% cut in corporate tax to 19%.

IBD Argues Against Back-Door Capital Gains Tax Hike

With the support of some Republicans, revenue-hungry politicians are contemplating a tax hike on the “private equity” industry. These firms help ensure the efficient allocation of capital. And as Investor’s Business Daily explains, part of their reward for successful investing is a share of the capital gain. In an ideal tax system, there is no capital gains tax. Investments, after all, are made with after-tax dollars. It certainly would be a mistake, therefore, to move in the other direction by more than doubling the rate:

With the Sarbanes-Oxley regulatory regime making life miserable for many public companies, a number of troubled firms have innovatively turned to private equity to better their fortunes — or even save themselves. …So why do prominent members of both parties in Congress, and even the Bush administration’s Justice Department, seem poised to declare war on private equity? …It’s not surprising that Democrat Barney Frank, chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, plans hearings on private equity. More alarming, Charles Grassley, ranking Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, is considering joining that panel’s Democratic chairman, Max Baucus of Montana, in pounding the PE industry with a massive tax increase. Private equity firms usually take a 20% profit share, or “carry,” on their complex deals. Under current law, the carry is subject to the 15% long-term capital gains tax. Grassley wants it taxed at the 35% rate for ordinary income. The New York Times has hailed this “Grassley Tax” on jobs and capital as the first step toward a general capital gains tax hike — a surefire means of pulling the rug out from under the vibrant economy. …Congress will get just $5 billion to $7 billion in annual revenues from the Grassley Tax — hardly worth its ruinous economic costs. …Does the senior senator from Iowa, who likes to tout himself as a tax cutter, really want his epitaph to end up being: “Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-France”?

Hollywood For the Stylish

I loved this. It seems that there is a push (led by a fashion lawyer and a fashion show consultant, no less) for Washington, D.C. to get its own version of Chicago’s Magnificent Mile. According to today’s Yeas and Nays column in the Examiner (second item), a few D.C. council members are pushing to create a “Commission on Fashion Arts and Events.” It will “recognize the achievements of D.C.’s burgeoning fashion community” (really) and dedicate a section of the “city’s landscape” for fashion retail.

Bad Tax System and Predictable Bureaucratic Sloth Put Americans at Greater Risk of Adverse Consequences in Cases of Identity Theft

A story in Tax-news.com reports on sloppy security at the IRS. The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration found numerous instances of confidential taxpayer information being improperly safeguarded. The article highlights the risks for taxpayers, mostly because of identity theft, but the untold story is that much of the risk is a function of the current tax system. Taxpayers today are forced to divulge information about their financial assets. Why? Because the internal revenue code contains pervasive double-taxation of income that is saved and invested. So if a thief steals an IRS laptop, he may be able to determine all of a taxpayer’s assets. Under a flat tax system, by contrast, there is no double-taxation. Income is taxed only one time, when first earned, and there is no additional tax if people save and invest their after-tax income. The only personal information the IRS would need to enforce a flat tax is the size of the taxpayer’s household and the level of wage and pension income. Under a national sales tax (assuming politicians could be trusted to completely eliminate the income tax), the IRS would have no personal taxpayer information:

…a new government report…has revealed just how vulnerable taxpayer data contained on employee laptops is to theft, fraud and other criminal abuses. The report by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) found that hundreds of IRS laptop computers and other computer devices had been lost or stolen, employees were not properly encrypting data on the computer devices, and password controls over laptop computers were not adequate. TIGTA concluded that as a result, “it is likely that sensitive data for a significant number of taxpayers have been unnecessarily exposed to potential identity theft and/or other fraudulent schemes.” The report prompted harsh criticism from Grassley, the senior Republican on the Finance Committee, who commented that: “Thieves are very good at mining sensitive data for their own end. One stolen IRS laptop could put thousands of taxpayers in jeopardy. It’s hard to see why this is still a problem when the IRS knew about it more than three years ago.” …The TIGTA report shows that theft of IRS computer equipment potentially containing sensitive information on thousands of taxpayers is running at alarmingly high levels. Between January 2, 2003, and June 13, 2006, IRS employees reported the loss or theft of at least 490 computers. A large number of IRS laptops were stolen from employees’ vehicles and residences, but 111 incidents occurred within IRS facilities, where employees were likely not storing their laptop computers in lockable cabinets while they were away from the office. …TIGTA also evaluated the security of backup data stored at four offsite facilities and found that data was not encrypted and adequately protected at the four sites. For example, at one site, non-IRS employees had full access to the storage area and the IRS backup media. Envelopes and boxes with backup media were open and not resealed. At another site, one employee who retired in March 2006 had full access rights to the non-IRS offsite facility when TIGTA inspectors visited in July 2006.

Albania Joins the Flat Tax Club

Spurred by tax competition, the flat tax revolution continues to generate positive results. Albania will have a 10 percent flat tax beginning in January 2008. The corporate rate also will be 10 percent, as will the payroll tax. The latter reform is particularly interesting since many of the flat tax nations in Eastern Europe retain punnitive payroll tax rates - a policy that undermines the pro-growth and pro-employment effects of the flat tax. The Southest European Times reports:

In a bid to promote growth and improve the business climate, the administration of Albanian Prime Minister Sali Berisha plans a major overhaul of the tax system. The biggest change is a switch to a flat tax. “As of January 1st, 2008, Albania will have implemented the 10% flat tax system, one of the lowest in Europe,” Berisha told a business community meeting in late March. Corporate taxes, currently at 20%, are to be slashed in half. Social security contributions from businesses will likewise be capped at 10%. The government and other supporters of the reform say it will widen the taxable base and simplify tax administration, while also making Albania an easier place to invest. According to Finance Minister Ridvan Bode, the changes will lead to a more streamlined fiscal system. “The flat tax helps eliminate the potential arbitrage between corporate tax, dividend taxes and the income tax,” he says. VAT and other taxes will also be gradually reduced in order to woo investors, the minister added. …In the past, the IMF has been wary of plans to reduce taxes in Albania. This time, however, it seems more receptive – provided the overhaul is combined with more effective revenue collection. “We will negotiate with the Albanian government about the tax reduction, depending on the tax collection,” IMF representative Ann Margaret Westin told the press.

High Taxes are Hurting Michigan’s Economy

An onerous tax burden, combined with the inevitable inefficiencies that occur when politicians try to pick winners and losers, are causing Michigan’s economy to lag compared to other states. A column in the Wall Street Journal notes that the governor wants higher taxes - policies that will accelerate Michigan’s decline:

Michigan’s private sector is contracting compared to the expanding tax bases of every other state. The economic fog will lift when policies are enacted that make Michigan a good place to do business for newcomers as well as for existing firms. This won’t happen if the legislators in Lansing, the state capital – who advocate heavier tax burdens on the remaining taxpayers to subsidize or attract firms handpicked by government officials – get their way. These targeted subsidies simply redistribute scarce income. Nor is the governor, Jennifer Granholm, moving in the right direction. Her recent call to impose a 2% tax on most services is a nonstarter. But she’s also calling for a new tax on the estates of wealthy residents, giving those with the means an even more urgent reason to leave. Michigan’s slide will continue.

If Michigan policy makers want the state to prosper, they should return to the policies that originally helped create wealth. First on the list would be repeal of the personal income tax:

Michigan was a formidable competitor prior to 1967, when the state had no personal income tax. Why not return to these days by abolishing the state’s 3.9% personal income tax and replace it with nothing? Even a slow phase-out of the tax will allow the state to vie for business, new jobs and private-sector investment with fast-growing Florida, Texas and the nearly half-dozen other states that do not levy an income tax. If Florida and Texas – two of the fastest growing states in the union – can survive without income taxes, Michigan can too.