Topic: Government and Politics

Civil Liberties in Britain

David Davis, the shadow home secretary in the United Kingdom (that is, the prospective attorney general should the Conservative Party take power), has resigned his seat in the House of Commons to protest Parliament’s approval of a bill that would allow the government to hold terror suspects up to 42 days without charges.

Davis, generally regarded as a Thatcherite, said:

Until yesterday I took a view that what we did in the House of Commons representing our constituents was a noble endeavour because for centuries of forebears we defended the freedom of people. Well, we did, up until yesterday.

This Sunday is the anniversary of Magna Carta, a document that guarantees the fundamental element of British freedom, habeas corpus. The right not to be imprisoned by the state without charge or reason.

But yesterday this house allowed the state to lock up potentially innocent citizens for up to six weeks without charge.

He denounced the bill as “the one most salient example of the insidious, surreptitious and relentless erosion of fundamental British freedom” and went on to cite ID cards, “an assault on jury trials,” and “a DNA database bigger than any dictatorship has” as other elements of that erosion.

Davis said he would run in a special election to reclaim his seat by campaigning “against the slow strangulation of fundamental British freedoms by this government.” Observers expect him to win handily, as the Labour Party has fallen dramatically in the polls. But Conservative leader David Cameron has already appointed a new shadow home secretary, so Davis may have forfeited his leadership role.

I’m reminded of Phil Gramm, a Democratic congressman, who worked with President Reagan and the Republicans to cut taxes and spending in the early 1980s. When the Democratic leadership removed him from the Budget Committee, he switched to the Republican Party. Saying that the voters of his district should have the chance to decide whether they wanted a Republican representative, he resigned, ran in the special election as a Republican, was easily elected on Lincoln’s birthday, and the following year waltzed into the U.S. Senate.

Will Davis find such success by resigning and giving the voters a chance to assess his performance? Only time will tell… In the meantime, you can watch the video of his five-minute speech here.

What Use are Campaign Economists?

An irony of modern presidential campaigns is that they bring on board top tier economic advisors, but that doesn’t stop them from injecting economic nonsense into candidate speeches.  

Candidate Obama just added some skilled economists, but that didn’t prevent him from making ridiculous claims about recent economic policies in a speech yesterday. Take one Obama statement: “our president sacrificed investments in health care, and education, and energy and infrastructure on the altar of tax breaks for big corporations and wealthy CEOs.” Obama is wrong on every point in this remark.

Here are the facts from the federal budget looking at Bush’s first 7 years in office (FY2001 to FY2008):

  • Department of Health and Human Services spending up 67 percent in 7 years of Bush.
  • Department of Education spending up 92 percent in 7 years of Bush.
  • Department of Energy spending up 42 percent in 7 years of Bush.
  • Federal capital investment outlays up 35 percent for nondefense and 131 percent for defense in 7 years of Bush.
  • Federal corporate tax revenues up a stunning 128 percent in 7 years of Bush.

All these figures are available to the Obama campaign in the Federal Budget—Historical Tables. There is no reason for Obama and his advisors to make up nonsense statements about supposed spending cuts, when there are plenty actual failed economic policies that Bush could be criticized for.

Obama Should Learn from King Canute

Legendary tale of King Canute:

“King Canute (995-1035) ruler of England, Denmark and Norway, was surrounded by sycophants. One day, he ordered his courtiers to take him to the sea shore, where he challenged them, saying, ‘Do you believe that I can halt the sea?’ None disputed the fact, so Canute commanded the sea to cease its upwards march. But soon Canute’s feet were covered in water, showing that even he was unable to hold back the tide.”

Legendary tale of candidate Obama:

“I am absolutely certain that generations from now, we will be able to look back and tell our children that this was the moment when… the rise of the oceans began to slow and our planet began to heal.”

Chutzpah

Today’s Washington Times has a long interview with former House Majority Whip Tom DeLay in which he talks about the problems facing the Republican Party and his efforts to help rebuild it. As I have written, there is no doubt that the GOP is facing many problems today, many of them due to the big-government conservatism brought about in part by…Tom DeLay.

This is after all, the same Tom DeLay who:

  • Presided over an unprecedented spending binge by Congressional Republicans. In fact, DeLay was a cheerleader for using earmarks to buy votes for Republican candidates in competitive districts;
  • Twisted arms and threatened dissenters in order to pass the Medicare prescription drug benefit, the first new entitlement program in 40 years;
  • Helped sidetrack Social Security reform;
  • Helped start the “K Street Project,” a cynical exercise in vote buying that led to much of the corruption that plagued Republicans in recent years;
  • Once said that “there is simply no fat left to cut in the federal budget.”

If Republicans and/or conservatives really want to recapture their small government credentials, the might start by ignoring Tom DeLay.

No Need for a General Election; Obama Already Has Mandate

An article [$] today in CongressDaily AM outlines the plans of trade-skeptic congressional Democrats wishing to formalize that “time-out” on trade we’ve heard so much about during the Democratic primary campaign.

A bill introduced yesterday (H.R 6180 and its companion S.3083) would slow down the process of approving new trade agreements by requiring the GAO to review existing agreements and judge them not, as logic would seem to dictate, according to the standard of increasing trade, but against the domestic policy standards contained in the bill:

The bill would require GAO to review existing trade deals by June 10, 2010, and an analysis of how the deals stack up against labor, environmental and safety standards enumerated in the bill.

If gaps are found by GAO, the president would be required to submit renegotiation plans for current trade pacts before negotiating new ones and congressional consideration of pending trade pacts. Committees of jurisdiction would then review the renegotiation plans.

According to congressional Democrats, Senator Obama’s win in the Democratic primary is justification enough for introducing a bill that mirrors his plans. Those plans include, yes, loading up trade agreements with possibly deal-killing standards and, at least judging by Senator Obama’s voting record so far, very little new trade liberalization (details here).

If that sounds like a bad idea, it is music to the ears of some members of Congress. Here’s a quote from Rep. Michael Michaud (D, ME):

“I feel very comfortable with Sen. Obama’s position on trade; he understands the devastation that trade has caused to the American people and how flawed these trade deals are.”

We at Cato’s Center for Trade Policy Studies would refute that. Strenuously.

Gravy Train for European Politicians

In the dark days of the Soviet Union, the political elite (known as the nomenklatura) enjoyed immense privileges, including uncluttered roadway access on special ”Chaika lanes.” There’s now a new version of Chaika lanes, only this time the nomenklatura are members of the European Parliament. According to the UK-based Times, they are getting a special train to ferry them between Brussels and Strasbourg. Needless to say, the taxpayers who finance this elitist boondoggle will not be allowed to ride the train:

After years of being accused of riding the Brussels gravy train, members of the European parliament are about to step aboard a real one. A Eurocrats-only express service will be launched next month to ferry MEPs and officials in luxury at 186mph between one European parliament in Brussels and the other in Strasbourg. The buffet car will, of course, be fully stocked. The Strasbourg Express will leave Brussels for the first time at 9.57am on Monday, July 7. Each return journey will cost the taxpayer about £158,000, but the fare-paying public will be banned. MEPs will pay £170 for a return ticket, but will then be reimbursed. “The public will not be able to buy tickets or use this train,” said Thalys, the high-speed train operator that will run the service. …Every month, when the European parliament moves to Strasbourg, the “train of shame” will leave Brussels on a Monday, returning the following Thursday, with up to 377 MEPs and officials travelling each way in three spacious carriages. It is widely seen in Brussels as a gimmick to boost the French, whose insistence on maintaining the second parliament in Strasbourg makes such journeys necessary in the first place.

Whose Side Are You On?

In an article about the wave of conservative reform under Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal, the New York Times writes:

Meanwhile the House is considering an income tax cut that would cost the state $300 million. 

Another way to say that would be:

Meanwhile the House is considering an income tax cut that would save the taxpayers $300 million.

It all depends on whether you identify with the taxpayers or the tax consumers.