They’re Laughing in Texas

I realize the death penalty should be a serious topic, with thoughtful people trying to balance the value of deterrence against the risk of wrongful execution. But incredulous laughter was my first reaction when I read the report in the EU Observer that European politicians are hectoring Texas to suspend the death penalty. I’m not sure it would be possible to make the death penalty even more popular than it already is in the Longhorn Lone Star State, but I strongly suspect that Euro-nagging could overcome the laws of mathematics and push support for executions to more than 100 percent:

The European Union has strongly criticised death penalties carried out in Texas, calling on its authorities to halt the 400th execution in the US state. In a statement released on Tuesday (21 August), the Portuguese EU presidency said the bloc viewed with “great regret” the upcoming executions and urged Texas Governor Rick Perry to halt them and consider a moratorium on the death penalty. …” Commenting on the EU’s appeal to call off his death sentence, Governor Perry replied that it would be a “just and appropriate” punishment for the murderer. “Texans long ago decided the death penalty is a just and appropriate punishment for the most horrible crimes committed against our citizens,” his spokesman told the BBC. “Two hundred and thirty years ago, our forefathers fought a war to throw off the yoke of a European monarch and gain the freedom of self-determination,” he pointed out, adding “While we respect our friends in Europe, Texans are doing just fine governing Texas.”

UPDATE: A reader reminds me, “Texas is the Lone Star State, not the Longhorn State (except to certain partisans of the University of Texas).” I guess I watch too much college football.