The Greatest Deliberative Body?

Columnist Robyn Blumner has nice things to say about our new study, Power Surge, and she takes Congress to task for doing nothing: 

The Republican leadership in Congress is standing by while its house is being pillaged. The power to write federal laws is Congress’ alone. The president’s duty, as expressly stated in the Constitution, is to faithfully execute the laws he signs, not to add asterisks on parts he intends to ignore.

Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist and House Speaker Dennis Hastert are joining in their own emasculation when they utter not a peep during this bloodless coup. I don’t know why Republicans have a reputation for strength. When blindly supporting a president from your own party takes precedence over guarding Congress’ historic role, “Republican leadership” becomes an oxymoron.

It is not just liberals who have recognized the danger. I challenge anyone to read an important new report by the libertarian Cato Institute (www.cato.org) and not be chilled. “Power Surge: The Constitutional Record of George W. Bush” is an unblinking 28-page analysis of our slow devolution into autocracy. Its message can be summed up with this quote: “Under (the president’s) sweeping theory of executive power, the liberty of every American rests on nothing more than the grace of the White House.”

A meek and pliant Congress is allowing this new paradigm to take root.

One can almost hear Speaker Hastert trying to defend himself: ”Look, I said something about executive branch overreaching just this morning.  Ya know, I’ve signed off on some extraordinary police powers over the years, but there’s gotta be a limit to those powers.  The Constitution is clear: The right of members of Congress to be secure in their offices and homes shall not be violated!”