Police Misconduct, in Ferguson and Beyond

The violence in Ferguson is inexcusable. But it should not be seen as primarily a reaction to the grand jury’s decision not to indict Darren Wilson. Rather, it should be seen as a reaction to years of racially charged policing and a discriminatory justice. Argues Cato scholar Walter Olson, “Our system for dealing with police use of deadly force is broken. …A system for review of police misconduct must take care to vindicate and protect the innocent cop, but it also needs to deliver a credible promise of justice to the communities being policed.”

Reviving Growth: A Cato Online Forum

In conjunction with the upcoming conference on the future of U.S. economic growth, the Cato Institute has organized a special online forum to explore possible avenues for pro-growth policy reforms. We have reached out to leading economists and policy experts and challenged them to answer the following question: If you could wave a magic wand and make one or two policy or institutional changes to brighten the U.S. economy’s long-term growth prospects, what would you change and why? Their responses will all be made available here. We will post a few new essays each day in the run-up to the conference.

On Obama and Immigration

On Thursday, President Obama announced the provisions of his immigration executive order, which shift priorities for deportations. Cato scholar Alex Nowrasteh argues that in purely policy terms, the executive order will produce positive economic effects and legalize a significant number of unlawful immigrants. However, says Nowrasteh, “Governing by executive order is no way to run an immigration policy, let alone an entire government. …The GOP-controlled Congress should respond to Obama’s executive order by passing a bill that simplifies the immigration system.”

The Federal Emergency Management Agency: Floods, Failures, and Federalism

Federalism is supposed to undergird America’s system of handling disasters, particularly natural disasters. State, local, and private organizations should play the dominant role. Today, however, growing federal intervention is undermining the role of private institutions and the states in handling disasters.  In a new paper, Cato scholar Chris Edwards looks at FEMA’s response to major disasters, and argues that policymakers should reverse course and begin cutting FEMA. “Ultimately,” says Edwards, “the agency should be closed down by ending aid programs for disaster preparedness and relief and privatizing flood insurance.”

Recent Commentary

Events

December 1

James Buckley on Reviving Federalism

Featuring James L. Buckley, Former U.S. senator and federal judge; Roger Pilon, Vice President for Legal Affairs, Cato Institute, and Director, Cato Center for Constitutional Studies; and Chris Edwards, Editor, DownsizingGovernment.org, Cato Institute; moderated by John Maniscalco, Director of Congressional Affairs, Cato Institute.

12:00pm B-354 Rayburn House Office Building

Of Special Note

Win a Free GoPro Hero3 Digital Video Camera

Win a Free Go Pro

Sign up in the month of November to receive any of Cato’s free emails, and you’ll automatically become eligible to win a free, brand new GoPro Hero3 digital video camera – waterproof, Wi-Fi compatible, wonderful. A winner will be selected at random on December 1 from the email addresses of all who have signed up.

It’s a win – win. You’ll be able to start receiving emails on upcoming Cato events, links to Cato’s newest research reports, multimedia products, podcasts, special book and ebook offers, and more, while being in line to receive a free GoPro camera. Sign up now.

Special! 10 Copies for $10

Cato Pocket Constitution

To encourage people everywhere to better understand and appreciate the principles of government that are set forth in America’s founding documents, the Cato Institute published this pocket-size edition.

Special Online Forum

Reviving Economic Growth

In conjunction with the upcoming conference on the future of U.S. economic growth, the Cato Institute has organized a special online forum with leading economists and policy experts to explore possible avenues for pro-growth policy reforms.

Read the essays

The 2014 Cato Institute Surveillance Conference

The 2014 Cato Institute Surveillance Conference

Friday, December 12, 2014
9:00 a.m. — 5:30 p.m.

Never in human history have people been more connected than they are today — nor have they been more thoroughly monitored But the growth of government surveillance is not restricted to spies: Ordinary law enforcement agencies increasingly employ sophisticated tracking technologies Is this a vital weapon against criminals and terrorists — or a threat to privacy and freedom? How should these tracking technologies be regulated? Can we reconcile the secrecy that spying demands with the transparency that democratic accountability requires? This Conference will explore these questions, guided by: top journalists and privacy advocates; lawyers and technologists; intelligence officials … and those who’ve been targets of surveillance.

Details and registration