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Today, there is no greater impediment to American prosperity than the immense body of regulations chronicled in the Federal Register, and academic analysis has documented the economic inefficiencies engendered by the regulatory state. Cato’s regulatory studies set forth a market-oriented vision of “regulatory rollback” that relies on the incentive forces of private property rights to create competitive markets and to provide consumer information and protection.

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To encourage people everywhere to better understand and appreciate the principles of government that are set forth in America’s founding documents, the Cato Institute published this pocket-size edition.

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Reviving Economic Growth

In conjunction with the upcoming conference on the future of U.S. economic growth, the Cato Institute has organized a special online forum with leading economists and policy experts to explore possible avenues for pro-growth policy reforms.

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The 2014 Cato Institute Surveillance Conference

The 2014 Cato Institute Surveillance Conference

Friday, December 12, 2014
9:00 a.m. — 5:30 p.m.

Never in human history have people been more connected than they are today — nor have they been more thoroughly monitored But the growth of government surveillance is not restricted to spies: Ordinary law enforcement agencies increasingly employ sophisticated tracking technologies Is this a vital weapon against criminals and terrorists — or a threat to privacy and freedom? How should these tracking technologies be regulated? Can we reconcile the secrecy that spying demands with the transparency that democratic accountability requires? This Conference will explore these questions, guided by: top journalists and privacy advocates; lawyers and technologists; intelligence officials … and those who’ve been targets of surveillance.

Details and registration