In limited but important ways, Washington can positively influence economic policy in Latin America. At a time when some countries in the region have seen the rise of populist governments, political turmoil, and a general backlash against free-market reforms that were partially implemented in the 1990s, the United States should exercise its influence by opening its market to the region’s goods and by encouraging market reforms.

More on Latin America and Caribbean

Commentary

Can Anyone Save Haiti? Crisis Offers New Chance

By Marian L. Tupy. SunSentinel. July 16, 2015.

Why the Rule of Law Is Vital to the Value of Money

By Steve H. Hanke. South China Morning Post. June 22, 2015.

Puerto Rico Is America’s Greece

By Richard W. Rahn. Washington Times. June 22, 2015.

Cato Studies

Kingpin Approaches to Fighting Crime and Community Violence: Evidence from Mexico’s Drug War

By Jason M. Lindo and María Padilla-Romo. Research Briefs in Economic Policy No. 31. July 29, 2015.

Retail Globalization and Household Welfare: Evidence from Mexico

By David Atkin, Benjamin Faber, and Marco Gonzalez-Navarro. Research Briefs in Economic Policy No. 30. July 15, 2015.

Growth without Poverty Reduction: The Case of Costa Rica

By Juan Carlos Hidalgo. Economic Development Bulletin No. 18. January 23, 2014.

Articles

Should Latin America Worry About a Weak Dollar?

Steve H. Hanke. Latin America Advisor. June 2, 2003.

Cato Reviews & Journals

Events

The Global Village Myth: Distance, War, and the Limits of Power

Featuring Justin Logan. May 26, 2015. Book Forum.

Toward a New Era in U.S.-Cuba Relations

Featuring Juan Carlos Hidalgo. February 5, 2015. Policy Forum.

Argentina v. Holdout Creditors: Applying the Rule of Law to Resolve Debt Default

Featuring Juan Carlos Hidalgo. December 11, 2013. Policy Forum.