The Appeal of Trusted Traveler

There is a natural appeal to “trusted traveler” programs. We all see ourselves as trustworthy, and getting into such a program might improve our experience at the airport. This video captures the notion—and some of the difficulties—entertainingly.

I would fly on a plane even knowing that Jimmy Johnson had brought a machete on board. But what level of trust should attach to a Super Bowl ring?

Dave Meggett helped the New York Giants win Super Bowl XXV. He was sentenced to 30 years in prison last month after being convicted of criminal sexual misconduct and burglary. Super Bowl MVP Ray Lewis was charged with murder in 2000, avoiding trial by agreeing to testify against others. The point is not to beat up on the NFL, but to beat up on the idea that you can trust a large-scale “trusted traveler” program.

Having some weakness is not fatal to the trusted traveler idea. A trusted traveler program might reduce costs and inconveniences without reducing risks by a greater amount. Indeed, it might make sense to trust all travelers more than the TSA does under its strip/grope policy.

In a recent, less entertaining post, I argued that the TSA shouldn’t do “trusted traveler.” Airlines should be free to implement trusted traveler systems, winning the rewards for getting it right and paying the costs for getting it wrong.