Will Uribe Betray Liberal Democracy in Colombia?

After months of speculation, the Colombian Senate approved a constitutional amendment that would allow President Alvaro Uribe to run for a second reelection next year. Obstacles remain, however, and the amendment still has to be voted on in the House of Representatives, pass a review process by the Constitutional Court, and be put to a popular referendum — where it’s likely to be approved given Uribe’s high popularity among Colombian voters.

None of these required steps are certain: the final vote in the House of Representatives is not assured; the Constitutional Court might find irregularities during the discussion of the bill in Congress; and time is running out for organizing a national referendum before next year’s election. However, these last-minute efforts to change Colombia’s constitution and Uribe’s blatant interest in running again are troublesome.

I’ve praised Alvaro Uribe’s record before in tackling crime and guiding Colombia out of the abysm it was in at the start of the decade. However, democracy must transcend the virtues of any leader. Just as it is ominous for Venezuela’s democracy that Hugo Chávez plans to perpetuate himself in office, it would be unhealthy for Colombia’s democratic institutions for Uribe to run for a third consecutive term.

The ultimate decision will likely be Alvaro Uribe’s. This is his chance to show the world whether he’s loyal to liberal democracy or to the power he has become accustomed to.