A More ‘Social’ EU

Nine EU nations are calling for a greater focus on “social protection” and “social rights” in order to promote “social Europe.” Needless to say, “social” is a code word for bigger government.

Most of the nine nations are in the usual-suspects category, but Hungary and Bulgaria are strange additions. Do they really think they can overcome the legacy of communism by shackling themselves to socialism?

The EU Observer reports on the latest skirmish in Europe’s fight against globalization:

France, Italy, Spain, Cyprus, Bulgaria, Luxembourg, Hungary, Belgium and Greece have all signed up to a two-page long declaration in which they argue that the 27-country bloc should be more than just an internal market. Calling their statement, which has been sent to all member states, “enhancing social Europe” the currently nine-strong group want to use the ongoing negotiations on the EU constitution as a springboard for their ideas.

It continues by saying that a Europe of 27 member states “cannot just be a free trade zone but shall guarantee the necessary balance between economic freedom and social rights.” Social Europe is defined as a set of “common values” such as social justice, equality and solidarity.

The call for more social Europe goes to the heart of a debate in Europe about the extent to which the bloc should adapt to the force of globalisation and the extent to which it should set certain social, environmental and work standards, which detractors say could hamper growth and competitiveness.