India’s CCS on School Choice

The Centre for Civil Society’s Raj Cherubal has an insightful post on the difference between bureaucratic “accountability” and real market accountability in education. He caps it off by pointing out the merits of education tax credits as a tool for providing universal access to the education marketplace.

If the poor have access to the money that the tax payers set aside to help the poor, they can use that money to access far better services that the private sector is able to provide. Instead of funding government services with taxes, empower the poor with it.

(What if the tax payer could give the money directly to the poor person and get a tax credit? No need to send it to the government and then redirect it to the poor with all the leaks in the system. Pay government for the services like defence that government is supposed to do.)

Today, I have choice. You, if you are poor, have none. Soon, thanks to the growing school choice movement in India, this will not be the case.

If the Centre’s national campaign for school choice really gains traction, the 21st century will belong to India. (Hat tip to Kuffir at Blogbharti.)