Good News from Hungary

In a recent article for the Weekly Standard, I noted that freedom in Hungary was under attack. In the past several years, the Prime Minister Viktor Orban has tightened its control over media, harassed civil society organizations, politicized the judiciary, nationalized $14 billion worth of assets from private pension funds, and populated the board of Hungary’s central bank by appointees of the ruling party, Fidesz. Mr Orban – who was once seen as a pro-market, liberal reformer – has also become Vladimir Putin’s most reliable partner in the EU, having hosted him for a working visit just last week.

But not all Hungarians are applauding as the country descends deeper into what could be called ‘goulash authoritarianism’. In fact, the parliamentary by-election in the county of Veszprem on Sunday has brought a very encouraging piece of news. A Fidesz candidate was defeated by an independent candidate, Zoltan Kesz, endorsed by a coalition of left-of-center parties.

“The left-right divide has been turned on its head in Hungary; the relevant distinction here is between the pro-Western and pro-Eastern political parties,” says Mr Kesz, referring to Mr Orban’s geopolitical allegiances. It should also be said that Mr Kesz is no ordinary politician. An activist and English teacher, he is the founder of Hungary’s premier libertarian think-tank, the Free Market Foundation. Interestingly, given the toxic political and ideological environment in Hungary, the organization has become known as the leading voice against racism in the country, and much of its efforts have been aimed to counter the rise of political forces such as the xenophobic Jobbik party, which is currently the third largest political force in the country.

Mr Kesz’ election is significant because it brings an end to the narrow supermajority, which Fidesz enjoyed in the Hungarian parliament since the election last year. In 2013, the parliament passed a number of controversial constitutional amendments, and many feared that the unchecked dominance of Fidesz could herald the demise of Hungarian democracy. While Mr Kesz’ electoral victory assuages those fears somewhat, he will be fighting an uphill battle to get his country back on track.