ESSA Seems Ripe for Federal Control

Think the end of the No Child Left Behind Act means the end of federal micromanagement? You may have to think again.

As I’ve laid out before, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) has several ambiguities that seem to keep the door open for continued federal control over state standards, tests, and accountability mechanisms, even as the law has some provisions that seem to prohibit federal intervention. What, for instance, constitutes “challenging” state standards, and who determines that? Or who decides what the right mix of academic and non-academic factors is in school accountability schemes? It certainly seems that because this is federal law, and it includes required federal approval of state plans, there will be federal control.

A report on comments from numerous interest and advocacy groups as the U.S. Department of Education prepares to write ESSA regulations – frankly, where law is really made – only bolsters the fear of continued federal domination. While some groups are certainly calling for a light federal touch, others clearly want continued force. As the Connecticut Coalition for Achievement Now – hardly just a player in the Nutmeg State – wrote:

As you establish rules and regulations around the ESSA, we urge you to maintain challenging and high standards for all students, ensure high-quality, valid and reliable annual statewide assessments, and implement comprehensive and robust school and district accountability and performance systems that help identify and improve our highest need schools and districts.

Sound like a light federal touch? Not to me, either.

Thankfully, rules and regs haven’t been written yet, and there is still time to address what appear to be very real threats of continued federal control both specifically in the law, and ultimately in regulation. And address them we shall on February 16, when Cato will host a debate between experts who see the ESSA as returning power to states and districts, and those who see that as a very uncertain proposition. Or maybe you think the law goes too far removing influence from DC. Well we’ll tackle that, too, especially if you join us – either in-person or online, and using #FedsLeaveEd on Twitter – and ask our panel about it.

Does the ESSA really relinquish federal power? That remains an open question, and lots of people – including at Cato – will be debating what the answer should be.