East Asia is likely to grow in economic importance to the United States in coming years, but that makes it even more essential for Washington to simultaneously reduce the military burden on the American economy and force its trading partners to bear the full cost of their own defense. Otherwise U.S. firms will have difficulty taking advantage of expanding economic opportunities in the region.

More on East Asia

Cato Studies

A Costly Commitment: Options for the Future of the U.S.-Taiwan Defense Relationship

By Eric Gomez. Policy Analysis No. 800. September 28, 2016.

Should Free Traders Support the Trans- Pacific Partnership? An Assessment of America’s Largest Preferential Trade Agreement

By Daniel J. Ikenson, Simon Lester, Scott Lincicome, Daniel R. Pearson, & K. William Watson. Working Paper No. 39. September 12, 2016.

The Genesis and Evolution of China’s Economic Liberalization

By James A. Dorn. Working Paper No. 38. August 22, 2016.


The Korea Syndrome: An Examination of War-Weariness Theory

Brad Stapleton. Journal of Cold War Studies. Vol. 17. No. 3. Summer 2015.

The Contradictions of U.S. China Policy: Implications for the U.S. Air Force

Justin Logan. The Asia-Pacific Century: Challenges and Opportunities. 2013.

U.S. Policy toward the Two Koreas after the U.S. and ROK Elections in 2012

Doug Bandow. International Journal of Korean Studies. Vol. 16. No. 2. Winter 2012.

Cato Reviews & Journals

A New Bet?

Art Carden. Regulation. Fall 2016.

Trade and Adjustment Costs

Pierre Lemieux. Regulation. Fall 2016.

Rent Seeking and Entrepreneurship: Internet Startups in China

Tain-Jy Chen and Ying-Hua Ku. Cato Journal. Fall 2016.


China’s Future Depends on a Free Market for Ideas

Featuring Ian Vásquez. October 6, 2016. Policy Forum.

Dealing with China’s Steel Overcapacity

Featuring Daniel R. Pearson and Daniel J. Ikenson. October 5, 2016. Policy Forum.

The Cultural Revolution: A People’s History, 1962–1976

Featuring Xia Yeliang and Marian L. Tupy. April 25, 2016. Book Forum.