Signs of Sanity at the International Trade Commission

Today is a pretty good day, as far as trade policy goes.

This morning, pursuant to a five-year “Sunset Review,” the U.S. International Trade Commission voted to revoke longstanding antidumping and countervailing duty restrictions against imported carbon steel plate and corrosion-resistant steel from 15 different countries.  The ITC also voted to continue the measures against corrosion-resistant steel from Korea and Germany for at least another five years.

While not perfect, today’s outcome is something to rejoice.  Revocation of trade remedy restrictions is rare, indeed, and rarer still where steel is concerned.

As described in this recent paper, the U.S. steel industry is doing phenomenally.  And given the dramatic growth in demand for steel in other regions of the world, today’s decision is unlikely to produce a significant surge in U.S. steel imports.  But at least now, U.S. steel consuming industries, which have been forced to endure some of the highest steel prices in the world on account of the limited competition, will have greater flexibility and negotiating leverage to counter the growing market power of the domestic steel industry.