At First Anniversary, ObamaCare on the Run

One year ago today, President Barack Obama signed ObamaCare into law. I recap ObamaCare’s first year in my latest Kaiser Health News column. Here’s some additional news surrounding the law’s anniversary.

Politico reports that supporters won’t have the vast war chest to defend the law that they once said they would:

Democrats are under siege as they mark the first anniversary of health care reform Wednesday — and they won’t get much help from the star-studded, $125 million support group they were once promised…[N]ine months later, the Health Information Campaign has all but disappeared. Its website hasn’t been updated since the end of last year. Its executive director and communications director are gone. There’s no sign that it has any money. And neither [former senator Tom] Daschle nor [former White House Communications Director Anita] Dunn will return calls asking about it.

Politico also reports on what everyone knows, but few reporters seem willing to say.  ObamaCare is unpopular, and growing more so:

Although Democrats insisted that the [law] would become more popular once the congressional debate ended and the benefits started to kick in, the reverse has actually happened. According to a Kaiser Health Tracking poll released Friday, 46 percent of the public opposes the law, up from 40 percent a year ago. Only 42 percent support the law, down from 46 percent a year ago.

Finally, Politico (again) reports that yet another governor – Louisiana’s Bobby Jindal (R) – has refused to implement ObamaCare:

The Louisiana governor’s office gave PULSE the first definitive answer on whether it would run its own health exchange, and it took them only two letters: no. “Obamacare is a terrible policy that needs to be repealed and replaced,” Gov. Bobby Jindal’s press secretary Kyle Plotkin tells PULSE. “It creates enormous new costs and future unfunded liabilities for states financing their Medicaid programs.” That puts him in a similar camp with Florida Gov. Rick Scott, who recently told us that Florida is “not doing anything with regards to the exchange, I don’t believe in the exchange. It doesn’t do anything to improve access to care. It does nothing to drive down health care costs.”

It’s worth emphasizing that Scott and Jindal probably know more about health care than the other 48 governors.