Christians Should Vote for Good Governance over Good Theology

Politicians pander. It’s what they do. But Christians seem especially susceptible to those claiming to be their spiritual brethren. It would be better if people of faith focused on candidates’ practical ability to perform the duties of what remains a secular office.

With the Iowa caucuses drawing near, it seems like every Republican tramping through the snow claims to be a Bible-believing, God-fearing, Jesus-loving Christian. A gaggle of church leaders are promoting their favorite presidential wannabe.

It’s a fruitless exercise. It’s rarely easy to judge whether a particular candidate’s faith claims are true. God told the prophet Samuel: “Man looks at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart.” (1 Samuel 16:7)

For instance, Ted Cruz appears to have done the best this year in presenting himself as a committed Christian. His religious tale, including the conversion story of his pastor father, is contained in an 18-minute documentary. By all accounts, Cruz is doing well among the most theologically conservative Republicans in Iowa.

Yet McKay Coppins of BuzzFeed reported on doubts about Cruz’s faithfulness. Moreover, in late 2014, Cruz used a conference on persecuted Christians from the Middle East, among the most vulnerable people on the planet, as a campaign prop.

Cruz also gave less than one percent of his income to charity between 2006 and 2010. Opposing candidate Mike Huckabee observed: “It’s hard to say God is first in your life if he’s last in your budget.”

Donald Trump has been doing his best to pander without a carefully crafted story. Running casinos with strip clubs is unusual “fruit” from a Christian walk. His style of campaigning doesn’t exactly advance the Christian faith.

How about the rest of the GOP candidates? What do they really believe about God? Do they have a personal relationship with Jesus?

The best response is: who cares? One’s theological views just don’t tell much about a person’s competence to perform a civil office. Voters should care most about how a candidate would confront Washington’s virtual fiscal insolvency, end America’s constant warring in the Middle East, address dependency as well as poverty among the poor, and deal with other serious policy issues.

Indeed, by the most public measures of behavior, President Barack Obama appears to be a more faithful Christian than Donald Trump. Yet many political activists who loudly assert their Christian faith are trending toward the Donald. Indeed, Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr., gave a fulsome introduction to Trump, even comparing Trump to Jesus in expressing unpopular opinions.

It actually would have been more reassuring had Liberty University invited Trump to speak and The Donald done so, with neither pandering to the other. Trump ain’t my cup of tea, but the argument for his candidacy is entirely secular. Nevertheless, Christians should vote for him if they believe him to be the best candidate—and not because they believe him to be a faithful Christian like themselves.

As I wrote for American Spectator: “After years of being manipulated by ambitious politicos, believers should check their credulity at the polling place door. Christians shouldn’t cast their ballots based on their perceptions of the contenders’ religious faith. Martin Luther was right when he declared that he preferred to be governed by a smart Turk than a stupid Christian.”

Goodness and faithfulness are important, but no substitute for competence. Believers and nonbelievers alike should choose the best candidate, not the best Christian, for president.