general welfare clause

Celebrating James Madison

Two hundred and sixty years ago, James Madison was born in Virginia. His life was long and eventful, comprising the American Revolution, the writing and ratification of the U.S. Constitution, the founding of political parties, the War of 1812, and the rise of Andrew Jackson. The struggles that would culminate in the Civil War were evident in the last years of his life.

Responding to Akhil Amar on Obamacare

Yale law professor Akhil Amar, one of the nation’s leading constitutional scholars and a “progressive originalist” of sorts – he joined with Randy Barnett and others on a brief supporting our view of the Privileges or Immunities Clause in the McDonald case – had a fiery op-ed about Judge Vinson’s decision in the Sunday L.A. Times.  More than fiery; I’d say intemperate, uncharacteristically so for the mild-mannered Prof. Amar.

Cite the Constitutional Authority or the Lack Thereof!

A new House rule requires that every new bill or joint resolution introduced in the House include a statement citing the specific powers in the Constitution granted to Congress to enact the proposed law.  In the absence of such a statement, the clerk of the House will not accept the bill and it will be returned to the sponsor.

This new rule may have two potentially valuable effects:

Subscribe to RSS - general welfare clause