The Cato Institute’s Project on Public Opinion conducts high quality public opinion surveys, in‐​depth studies, and experiments to investigate what Americans think about important public policy issues, what values and assumptions motivate their beliefs, and how their opinion changes and evolves. Our data‐​driven social science research informs policymakers, opinion leaders, policy experts, journalists and the general public so that they may better understand how public attitudes are shaping America. Project scholars are active members of the American Political Science Association (APSA) and American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR) and adhere to the highest standards of academic rigor and excellence.

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FEATURED SURVEY

62% of Americans Say They Have Political Views They’re Afraid to Share

50% of strong liberals support firing Trump donors, 36% of strong conservatives support firing Biden donors; 32% are worried about missing out on job opportunities because of their political opinions.

Survey Reports

50% of strong liberals support firing Trump donors, 36% of strong conservatives support firing Biden donors; 32% are worried about missing out on job opportunities because of their political opinions

62% favor limiting police unions’ collective bargaining power; 55% worry criticism of police could drive up crime

Findings from the Cato Institute 2019 Welfare, Work, and Wealth National Survey

74% of Americans support a federal government program to provide 12 weeks of paid leave, but support slips after costs are considered.

Blog Posts

A new Cato Institute/​YouGov survey finds that self‐​censorship is on the rise. 62% say the political climate prevents them from saying things they believe because others might find them offensive.

Connor Friedersdor writes in the Atlantic that police reform is popular, while rioting is not. He’s right. The Cato 2016 Criminal Justice National Survey found that Americans across racial and political backgrounds support a variety of policy changes that reformers say would help mend fences between police and the communities they serve.

Young Americans are more likely to hold negative views towards the rich, support increasing taxes on the rich, and have favorable views of socialism.