June 22, 2010 3:26PM

New Report: DC Voucher Program Still a Success

The latest and final scheduled report on the DC voucher program is out.

Conclusion?

Even a tiny, restricted program that’s only been around for six years increases graduation rates, has a positive impact on at least some groups of students, harms no groups of students, and does this for less than a third of what the DC Public Schools spend.

DCPS spends around $28,000 per student. The last report pegged the average voucher at just $6,620. The maximum voucher cost is just $7,500.

Huge sums of money saved, student performance increased, parents happier . . . why is this program being killed?

Oh, right.

June 17, 2010 11:35AM

Unfortunately, One Man’s “Paranoia” Is Everyone Else’s “Reality”

Finished with my woman
'Cause she couldn't help me with my mind
People think I'm insane
Because I am frowning all the time

- Black Sabbath, "Paranoid"

According to the Fordham Institute's Chester Finn, I and others like me are "paranoid." So why, like Ozzy Osbourne, am I "frowning all the time?" Because I look at decades of public schooling reality and, unlike Finn, see the tiny odds that "common" curriculum standards won't become federal standards, gutted, and our crummy education system made even worse.

Finn's rebuttal to my NRO piece skewering the push for national standards, unfortunately, takes the same tack he's used for months: Assert that the standards proposed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative are better than what most states have produced on their own; say that adopting them is "voluntary;" and note that we've got to do something to improve the schools.

Let's go one by one:

First, as Jay Greene has pointed out again and again, the objection to national standards is not that the proposed CCSSI standards are of poor quality (though not everyone, certainly, agrees with Finn's glowing assessment of them). The objection is that once money is attached to them -- once the "accountability" part of "standards and accountability" is activated -- they will either be dumbed down or just rendered moot by a gamed-to-death accountability system. 

This kind of objection, by the way, is called "thinking a few steps ahead," not "paranoia."

It's also called "learning from history." By Fordham's own, constant admission, most states have cruddy standards, and one major reason for this is that special interests like teachers' unions -- the groups most motivated to control public schooling politics because their members' livelihoods come from the public schools -- get them neutered. 

But if centralized, government control of standards at the state level almost never works, there is simply no good reason to believe that centralizing at the national level will be effective. Indeed, it will likely be worse with the federal government, whose money is driving this, in charge instead of states, and parents unable even to move to one of the handful of states that once had decent standards to get an acceptable education.

Next, let's hit the the "voluntary" adoption assertion. Could we puh-leaze stop with this one! Yes, as I note in my NRO piece, adoption of the CCSSI standards is technically voluntary, just as states don't have to follow the No Child Left Behind Act or, as Ben Boychuk points out in a terrific display of paranoia, the 21-year-old legal drinking age. All that states have to do to be free is "voluntarily" give up billions of federal dollars that came from their taxpaying citizens whether those citizens liked it or not! 

So right now, if states don't want to sign on to national standards, they just have to give up on getting part of the $4.35 billion Race to the Top fund. And very likely in the near future, if President Obama has his way, they'll just have to accept not getting part of about $14.5 billion in Elementary and Secondary Education Act money.

Some voluntarism....

Finally, there's the "we've got to do something to fix the schools" argument. I certainly agree that the education system needs fixing. My point is that it makes absolutely no sense to look at fifty centralized, government systems, see that they don't work, and then conclude that things would be better if we had just one centralized, government system. And no, that other nations have national standards proves nothing: Both those nations that beat us and those that we beat have such standards.

The crystal clear lesson for those who are willing to see it is that we need to decentralize control of education, especially by giving parents control over education funding, giving schools autonomy, and letting proven, market-based standards and accountability go to work. 

Oh, right.  All this using evidence and logic is probably just my paranoia kicking in again.

 

April 14, 2010 2:07PM

“Stimulus” = Education Funding Floor?

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We were warned.

When Washington passed the so-called "stimulus" bill, with its tens-of-billions for K-12 education, we were warned that the money wouldn't just provide a one-time infusion of supposedly economy-saving cash. No, it would furnish a towering new spending floor for already super-funded government schools and numerous other beneficiaries.

Well here come the sky lifts again. According to Education Week, Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) is pushing legislation that would pile $23 billion in new federal funding into education once the stimulus cash dries up. And this money -- which, of course, we don't actually have -- is intended not only to protect the jobs of teachers and other staff, but add even more employees to the obscene jobs program that is public schooling.

Would this be a good time to mention that the Constitution gives the federal government zero authority to fund or control education? Oh, who cares about that?

March 15, 2010 1:41PM

Monday Links

  • An overview of the many hurdles the health care bill still faces in the House.
  • Will conservatives ultimately oppose the war in Afghanistan? Join us for a lively discussion this Thursday at Cato featuring Joe Scarborough, Grover Norquist, Rep. Tom McClintock (R-CA) and more. Registration free. Will be broadcast online live Thursday at the link.
March 11, 2010 12:10PM

They Spend WHAT? The Real Cost of Public Schools

Although public schools are usually the biggest item in state and local budgets, spending figures provided by public school officials and reported in the media often leave out major costs of education, and understate what is actually spent.

In a new study, Cato's Adam B. Schaeffer reviews district budgets and state records for the nation's five largest metro areas and the District of Columbia. Schaeffer finds that, on average, per-pupil spending in these areas is 44 percent higher than officially reported.

In this new video, Schaeffer explains the whole thing in under three minutes:

February 17, 2010 1:15PM

A Severe Irony Deficiency

Tomorrow night at 8:00pm, Fox Business News will air a John Stossel special on the failures of state-run schooling and the merits of parental choice and competition in education. I make an appearance, as do Jeanne Allen and James Tooley.

News of the show is already making the rounds, and over at DemocraticUnderground.com, one poster is very upset about it, writing:

When will these TRAITORS stop trying to ruin this country?

HOW can AMERICANS be AGAINST public education?

Stossel is throwing out every right-wing argument possible in his namby pamby singsong way while he "interviews" a "panel" of people (who I suspect are plants) saying things like preschool is a waste of money and why invest in an already-failing system....

I hate Stossel and I hate all of those who think the way he does.

This poster goes by the screen name "Live Love Laugh." I guess there wasn't enough space to tack "Hate" onto the end.

What this poster--and many good people on the American left--have yet to grasp is that critics of state monopoly schooling are NOT against public education. On the contrary, it is our commitment to the ideals of public education that compels us to pursue them by the most effective means possible, and to abandon the system that has proven itself, over many many generations, incapable of fulfilling them. I wrote about this crucial point more than a decade ago in Education Week, in a piece titled: "Are Public Schools Hazardous to Public Education."

Fortunately, a small but steadily growing number of American liberals have already grasped this pivotal difference between means and ends, as the growing Democratic support for Florida's school choice tax credit program evinces. Giving all families, particularly low income families, an easier choice between state-run and independent schools is the best way to advance the ideals of public education.

February 17, 2010 1:11PM

Public Schools = One Big Jobs Program

Who said public schooling is all about the adults in the system and not the kids? Everyone knows it's even more basic than that: Public schooling is a jobs program, pure and simple. At least, that's what one can't help but conclude as our little "stimulus" turns one-year old today.

"State fiscal relief really has kept hundreds of thousands of teachers and firefighters and first responders on the job," declared White House Council of Economic Advisers head Christina Romer today.

Throwing almost $100 billion at education sure as heck ought to have kept teachers in their jobs, and the unemployment numbers suggest teachers have had a pretty good deal relative to the folks paying their salaries. While unemployment in "educational services" -- which consists predominantly of teachers, but also includes other education-related occupations -- hasn't returned to its recent, April 2008 low of 2.2 percent, in January 2010 it was well below the national 9.7 percent rate, sitting at 5.9 percent.

Of course, retaining all of these teachers might be of value to taxpayers if having so many of them had a positive impact on educational outcomes. But looking at decades of achievement data one can't help but conclude that keeping teacher jobs at all costs truly isn't about the kids, but the adults either employed in education, or trying to get the votes of those employed in education. As the following chart makes clear, we have added teachers in droves for decades without improving ultimate achievement at all:

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(Sources: Digest of Education Statistics, Table 64, and National Assessment of Educational Progress, Long-Term Trend results)

Since the early 1970s, achievement scores for 17-year-olds -- our schools' "final products" -- haven't improved one bit, while the number of teachers per 100 students is almost 50 percent greater. If anything, then, we have far too many teachers, and would do taxpayers, and the economy, a great service by letting some of them go. Citizens could then keep more of their money and invest in private, truly economy-growing ventures. But no, we're supposed to celebrate the endless continuation of debilitating economic -- and educational -- waste.

You'll have to pardon me for not considering this an accomplishment I should cheer about.