Tag: podcast

Power Problems Podcast Survey

Power Problems is one year old! In our first year, the podcast has covered a lot of ground, from the death of the Iranian nuclear deal to the defense budget, trade policy and nuclear weapons. Surprising no one, we’ve spent way too much time talking about the Middle East and the curious foreign policy perspectives now emanating from 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

But as we head into the second year of our podcast, we’d like to get some feedback from our listeners, so we can give you more of what you enjoy. To help us out, please take a couple of minutes and fill out a quick survey on the podcast. You can find the survey here.

If you’re not already a listener, and want to hear what we’re all about, you can hear myself, Trevor Thrall, and a selection of guests from across the political spectrum discussing top foreign policy issues biweekly. You can find us on iTunes, Stitcher or via the Cato Audio app. 

Thanks for your feedback, and thanks for listening to Power Problems! 

Trump and Trade on the Cato Daily Podcast

This week the Cato Daily Podcast (Subscribe!) focuses on the importance of trade as the Trump Administration arrives next week. Here’s a quick rundown.

Monday:

Daniel J. Ikenson and Daniel J. Mitchell discusses the backgrounds and new roles for Trump’s “protectionist triumvirate” of Wilbur Ross, Peter Navarro, and Robert Lighthizer.

Tuesday:

Simon Lester discusses the potential fallout of President-elect Trump’s taking to Twitter to threaten companies like Carrier, Ford, Toyota, and General Motors.

A Happy Birthday to The Wealth of Nations

Today marks the 235th anniversary of Adam Smith’s An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, otherwise known as The Wealth of Nations. I chatted with GMU economics professor Russ Roberts on the book and its enduring impact. This is the first of a two-part discussion:

And you might as well subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or your RSS reader.

Thursday Links

  • Now that the health care bill is law, you should know exactly how it’s going to affect you, your premiums, and your coverage over the next few years. Here’s a helpful breakdown.
  • As the health care overhaul crosses home plate, global warming legislation steps up to bat.
Topics:

Monday Links

  • An overview of the many hurdles the health care bill still faces in the House.
  • Will conservatives ultimately oppose the war in Afghanistan? Join us for a lively discussion this Thursday at Cato featuring Joe Scarborough, Grover Norquist, Rep. Tom McClintock (R-CA) and more. Registration free. Will be broadcast online live Thursday at the link.

Tuesday Links

  • Kids these days…New study shows that most Millennials think “the government should do more to solve problems.” But if you take a closer look at the data there’s also some good news.
  • The case for reviving the “Privileges or Immunities” clause.

UPDATE:

Cato Vice President for Legal Affairs Roger Pilon can scarcely believe it himself: The New York Times got it (mostly) right on the gun case argued today before the Supreme Court, while The Wall Street Journal missed the main point.

In a piece for National Review Online, Pilon discusses a subtle but critical point: Conservatives—including the ones on the Supreme Court—are right on guns, but they’re wrong on rights.

Cato VP for Legal Affairs Roger Pilon can scarcely believe it himself: the New York Times got it (mostly) right on the gun case argued today before the Supreme Court, while the Wall Street Journal missed it.

Roger explains why in a terrific post over at National Review Online [hyperlink—you’re right, NRO is down!].

Roger’s post is the best discussion we’ve seen yet of a subtle but critical point: conservatives—including the ones on the Supreme Court—are right on guns, but they’re wrong on rights.

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