Tag: peter diamond

What Do Peter Diamond and Paul Pate Have in Common?

You might have heard of Peter Diamond, he recently won the Nobel Prize in Economics and earlier this week withdrew his nomination to the Federal Reserve Board. But maybe you have not heard of Paul Pate.

Mr. Pate, former Republican mayor of Cedar Rapids, Iowa was nominated by President Bush in 2003 to fill a seat on the board of the National Institute of Building Sciences. I remember it well, as I handled that nomination as staff for the Senate Banking Committee.

So what exactly do Mr. Diamond and Mr. Pate have in common? They were both nominated for positions they could not legally hold. I’ve written elsewhere about Mr. Diamond’s situation. Mr. Pate was barred from serving on the NIBS board due to an ownership interest he had in an asphalt company.

Bush’s Office of Presidential Personnel didn’t catch that problem because they, like Obama’s same Office, don’t appear to actually read the statutory qualifications for nominations. I will admit, I didn’t catch this problem either. It was brought to my attention by the staff of former senator Paul Sarbanes (D-MD). When I verified Sarbanes’s objection, we immediately told Mr. Pate and the Bush White House that then Committee Chair Richard Shelby would not move Mr. Pate’s nomination (despite Mr. Pate’s personal friendship with Sen. Grassley (R-IA)).

Both Mr. Diamond and Mr. Pate were, in part, the victim of circumstances beyond their control. They had done nothing wrong. Yet the law was the law. While I don’t equate NIBS with the Fed, that shouldn’t matter. We should respect the law regardless of the viewed relative importance of the position. In fact, I believe the more important the position, the greater need for respecting the law.

Unfortunately there is a lot Mr. Diamond and Mr. Pate do not have in common. Rather than accept his bad luck, Mr. Diamond offers in the New York Times the rant of a spoiled brat. Mr. Pate, in contrast, accepted his bad luck with integrity and grace.

Diamond Down

Today Nobel Prize-winning economist Peter Diamond announced he is withdrawing his nomination to the board of governors of the Federal Reserve System. 

Professor Diamond, in the pages of New York Times, blames the opposition to his nomination on both partisan politics and what he sees as a misunderstanding of the relationship between unemployment and monetary policy.  Mr. Diamond, however, is the one with a fundamental misunderstanding.  We all know unemployment is an important issue and needs to be addressed.  The question is whether it can be addressed with loose monetary policy.  Mr. Diamond apparently believes it can.  There are many who believe it cannot.  If all our labor market problems could be solved with loose money, then we’d already be at full employment.  In case Mr. Diamond didn’t notice, we aren’t.  We also have gone down this path too many times before. The belief in a long-run trade-off between unemployment and inflation has the been source of considerable economic harm.

It is interesting that Mr. Diamond does not address the legal obstacles to his nomination.  The foremost is that there can only be one board member from the same Fed district at any one time.  As Mr. Diamond notes he has been at MIT “since 1966” and not living in Chicago, as the White House claims.  Whatever his academic qualifications, by law he is prohibited from serving on the Fed Board.  If congressional Democrats don’t like the law, they can try to change it, but we should not just ignore it.  Such only breeds a contempt for the law and a belief that the laws only apply to the masses and not the elite. 

So to answer Mr. Diamond’s compaint that ” Nobel isn’t enough,” I would answer: Exactly. A Nobel does not place one above the law.  Sorry, Professor, you’re going to have to live with the same rules that apply to the rest of us.

Diamond Not Qualified for Fed Board

Tuesday the Senate Banking Committee meets for the second time to consider the nomination of Peter Diamond to a seat on the Federal Reserve’s Board of Governors. Since Professor Diamond was first nominated, he has been awarded the Nobel prize in economics.

Putting aside his academic qualifications, and his misguided views on Social Security, Professor Diamond is not qualified to be a Fed governor for one very simple reason: he is from a Federal Reserve district that already has representation on the Fed.  Paragraph 10-1 of the Federal Reserve Act requires that:

In selecting the members of the Board, not more than one of whom shall be selected from any one Federal Reserve district, the President shall have due regard to a fair representation of the financial, agricultural, industrial, and commercial interests, and geographical divisions of the country.

Mr. Diamond’s Senate paperwork states he is from Massachusetts, which is also the case for sitting Fed governor Dan Tarullo.  In fairness this provision of the law has been ignored and violated in the past.  In fact, both current Fed Governors Duke and Raskin are both from the Richmond district.  As Duke was there first, it would seem clear from a reading of the law and Raskin’s bio that Raskin is serving in violation of the statute.  But then given the actions of the Fed over the last few years, the Fed has certainly shown that it doesn’t feel constrained by statutes.

Bloomberg reports that despite what Diamond’s paperwork says, the White House claims he’s from Chicago.  Not that he’s ever lived there, but because he once gave a lecture at Northwestern.  Next I suspect the White House will claim an extended lay-over at O’Hare is sufficient for residency.

For perhaps the first time in history, all the Federal Reserve governors are from coastal states.  Also every single Fed governor is from a state that Obama won.  Only one governor is from west of the Mississippi river.  How anyone can believe the current make-up of the Board is a “fair representation” is beyond me.  Perhaps this is one explanation for the currently low public opinion of the Fed; it has become more a Cambridge-Wall Street-Washington echo chamber than anything else.