Tag: lyft

Demonizing Ride Hailing

Last week, a transportation consultant named Bruce Schaller published a report claiming that ride hailing was increasing traffic congestion. Since then, we’ve been innundated with wild claims Uber and Lyft were increasing traffic by 180 percent, and these claims are used to support arguments that that cities should tax companies like Uber and Lyft and use the revenues to compensate transit agencies for the riders lost to ride sharing.

Yet the congestion claims are completely inaccurate. Schaller concluded that, because well under half of ride-hailing trips would otherwise have used private automobiles, ride hailing put “2.8 new vehicle miles on the road for each mile of personal driving removed.” He went on to say that this is “an overall 180 percent increase in driving on city streets,” but that would be true only if ride hailing removed 100 percent of private driving from the streets.

The report also said that ride hailing added “5.7 billion miles of driving annually in the Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Seattle and Washington DC metro areas.” That sounds like a lot, but Federal Highway Administration data show that it is only about 1 percent of driving in those metro areas. Since, by Schaller’s estimation, about a third of ride-sharing travel displaced private auto travel, ride hailing added a net of just two-thirds of a percent of driving in those metro areas.

Nor does even that two-thirds of a percent necessarily add to congestion. A disproportionate share of ride hailing takes place during off-peak hours, so only a small portion of that two-thirds of a percent actually contributed to rush-hour congestion.

Aside from being arithmetically challenged, Schaller is an unabashed opponent of auto driving. “Cities need less driving, not more,” he says, claiming that cities that allow too much auto driving will be “drained of the density and diversity which are indispensable to their economic and social well-being.” The reality is that low-density cities that emphasize driving, such as Dallas and Houston, tend to be more affordable and more socially and economically diverse than high-density cities that emphasize transit such as New York and San Francisco.

To promote transit and limit driving, Schaller advocates imposing fees on Uber and Lyft of as much as $50 per hour. Cities that are already charging such fees (though less than $50 an hour) are using them to compensate transit agencies that have lost riders to ride sharing, a policy Schaller would applaud but one that makes as much sense as taxing pocket calculators to save the slide rule industry.

Only transit, says the report, can “make possible dense urban centers with lively, walkable downtowns; a rich selection of jobs, restaurants, entertainment and other activities; diversity of population; and intensive and inventive face-to-face interactions that make cities fertile grounds for business and artistic innovation.” Has New York City resident Schaller ever been to Silicon Valley? It doesn’t have a dense urban center and it’s transit system carries less than 5 percent of commuters to work and only about 1 percent of local passenger travel. Yet it is one of the most creative and innovative places on earth.

The reality is that the ride-hailing industry is threatening the transit industry, and transit advocates are demonizing Uber and Lyft in order to protect their $50 billion in annual subsidies. Schaller’s report estimates that ride-hailing grew by 710 million trips in 2017, the same year that transit ridership declined by 255 million trips. If just 36 percent of ride-hailing trips would otherwise have taken transit–a number Schaller’s report would seem to support–then ride hailing is responsible for 100 percent of the decline in transit.

The truth is that transit was obsolete before Uber and Lyft were invented. Nearly 96 percent of American workers have cars and most of the 4 percent who do not don’t take transit to work. Outside of New York City, transit plays a minor role in urban transport, and outside of New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Washington, Boston, and San Francisco, its role shrinks to insignificance. Given a choice between automobiles and transit, Americans have overwhelmingly chosen the former. Given a choice between ride hailing and transit, policy makers should also side with the mode that is faster, more convenient, and least subsidized.

Understanding Driver Discrimination in Ride-Hailing Platforms

Two experiments in a new working paper find some evidence that some drivers using popular ride-hailing platforms discriminate against riders. In some cases African-American riders faced longer wait times or higher probabilities of having a driver cancel on them. To some extent, these findings should temper hopes that these new technologies and platforms would succeed in quickly rooting out these forms of discrimination. It is important to note, however, that this study examined whether there was discrimination within these platforms, it did not compare ride-hailing platforms and traditional taxi companies. These new platforms do offer some advantages over the status quo when it comes to identifying the channels of discrimination through richer data, while the rating system gives riders some recourse to penalize discriminating drivers and an incentive for drivers to maintain a high rating.

In the study the researchers undertook two large-scale experiments to try to determine whether there was a pattern of discrimination for riders using these ride-hailing platforms.

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Madison Officials Recommend Misguided Rideshare Regulations

Earlier this week, members of a Madison, Wisconsin city subcommittee recommended misguided rideshare regulations relating to insurance, surge pricing, and hours of service that reveal a confused understanding of how ridesharing works.

If the subcommittee’s recommended regulations are implemented, companies such as Uber and Lyft, both of which provide ridesharing services, will have to provide at least $1 million worth of insurance coverage once a rideshare driver is logged into their app, regardless of whether there is a passenger in the car. In Madison, taxis are required to be covered by auto liability policies worth at least $1 million per accident. 

The $1 million insurance requirement in place for Madison taxis is higher than the insurance requirements in many other cities. In New York and Los Angeles, regulations require taxis to have at least $300,000 of coverage per incident. In Washington, D.C., taxis must have at least $50,000 per incident in coverage. Chicago requires taxis to be covered up to a combined single limit of $350,000 per incident.

It should be noted that both Uber and Lyft already have a $1 million policy in place from when a driver accepts a ride request to when a passenger is dropped off. What ridesharing companies will almost certainly object to is the recommended $1 million of coverage for the time when a rideshare driver has a rideshare app open but has not accepted a ride request. As it stands, both Uber and Lyft offer coverage for this time period worth up to $50,000 per individual per incident, $100,000 per incident, and $25,000 per incident for property damage. This coverage is designed to kick in if a driver’s personal auto insurance declines a claim.

California and Colorado, which have both passed legislation related to ridesharing insurance, mandate coverage very similar to the coverage already offered by Uber and Lyft for the period when a driver is logged into a ridesharing app but has not accepted a ride request. The differences between Uber’s and Lyft’s policies and the California and Colorado legislation are that the laws in Colorado and California require that the coverage be primary and that the property coverage be $30,000 rather than $25,000. The laws’ requirements go into effect on January 15, 2015 in the case of Colorado and on July 1, 2015 for California. 

In addition to insurance requirements subcommittee officials have also recommended a ban on “surge pricing” at times of peak demand. Both Uber and Lyft change the price of rides at busy times such as holidays when demand is high. Uber’s surge pricing policy was in the news shortly after Halloween this year when it emerged that a few individuals had paid enormous fares after they took an Uber ride during a time of increased demand. While some might think that Uber fares during “peak demand” are excessive, it is worth keeping in mind that before an Uber passenger can request a ride while surge pricing is in effect she must input the amount of the surge in the Uber app. In addition, the Uber app allows for users to estimate their fare. Likewise, Lyft informs users “prime time” fares are in effect before they request a ride.

What the surge price ban proposal reveals is a misunderstanding of how ridesharing works. Ridesharing drivers are not professional drivers and drive whenever they want. During popular times of partying or celebration (such as New Year’s or Halloween), rideshare drivers may have to decide between partaking in the festivities and driving. Surge pricing helps incentivize rideshare drivers to meet demand during busy times by allowing for increased profit. If passengers do not like surge pricing, the market will reflect that very quickly, so there is no need for Madison officials to interfere with the surge pricing systems in place.

Another set of recommendations made by the Madison subcommittee relates to hours of service. According to the recommended regulations, ridesharing companies will have to ensure that drivers are available 24/7 after one year of licensed service in Madison. This requirement, like the surge pricing ban, reveals a misunderstanding of ridesharing. Uber and Lyft do not control when drivers turn on ridesharing apps, rideshare drivers drive when they want. Regulators ought to leave the issue of driver availability to market forces rather than concern themselves with when private car owners use an app.

The regulations proposed by the Madison subcommittee betray a misunderstanding of an industry officials ought to welcome rather than burden with unnecessary regulations. Let’s hope that when the recommendations are put before the Madison Transit and Parking Commission next month, its members will realize how misguided these recommendations are. 

FDA Decides Not to Walk the Cheese Plank… for Now

FDA:  You know that artisanal cheese you love, that you have to age on wood planks? That’s dangerous and we don’t approve.

Fancy Cheese Lovers:  Hey, FDA, these cheese wheels will be your tombstones.

FDA:  Oh. What? Did you think we meant we were going to regulate your much loved, centuries-old practices out of existence just because we’re a regulatory agency that stops people from doing things for a living? Of course we’re not doing that… right now… while the media spotlight is so bright it’s hurting our eyes… but you’d better convince us we should allow you to do that anyway.

The latter bit is what has apparently played out this morning, according to Forbes online.

But as Cato’s Walter Olson explains, this apparent victory for sanity and liberty may simply be due to the fact that the usual advocates of regulatory encroachment in every aspect of our lives happened to have been personally inconvenienced this time around, and may have had the subject-area knowledge to realize how ridiculous this encroachment was. So, for once, they pushed back instead of rooting for leviathan.

If so, let’s hope they learn a broader lesson from this experience: maybe other people should also be left to make their own choices in the areas about which they care deeply. Maybe all that stifles is not gold.

And if you call Uber or Lyft to pick up your fancy cheese in Virginia, be prepared to get busted…they’re still banned.