Tag: healthcare

Socialized Medicine: From Anecdote to Data

Last night’s CNN duel between Senators Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz on the future of Obamacare was pretty illuminating for a recent arrival to the United States, with Senator Sanders’ playbook all-too-familiar to those of us from the UK.

Sanders wants a single-payer socialized healthcare system in the United States, just as we have in Britain. Any objection to that is met with the claim that you are “leaving people to die.” The only alternatives on offer, you would think, are the U.S. system as it exists now, or the UK system. Sanders did not once acknowledge that the UK structure, which is free at the point of use, inevitably means rationed care, with a lack of pre-screening. He also failed to acknowledge that lower health spending levels (indeed, even public spending on health is lower in the UK than the United States now) are not the same as efficiency—which is about outputs per input.

In the face of anecdote after anecdote about those saved by Obamacare and the virtues of a government-run health system, Cruz countered with some anecdotes from the UK showing the consequences of rationed care: a Scottish hospital turning away pregnant women, a woman in Wales waiting eight hours on the floor for an ambulance to arrive after a fall, and a hospital in Essex canceling life-saving cancer treatment because there were no free beds in intensive care. He could also have talked about the Mid-Staffs scandal, or a recent documentary showing doctors deciding between saving a cancer patient or a pensioner bleeding to death.

Anecdotes are powerful in helping to persuade people, and there are good reasons to use them in debates. Yet they are always susceptible to the charge that all health systems have extreme failures. Perhaps more powerfully then, the inadequacies of the UK system show up systematically in the data about how well conditions are dealt with (data from my former colleague Kristian Niemietz’s reports here and here):

  • In the United States, the age-adjusted breast cancer 5-year survival rate is 88.9 percent, compared with just 81.1 percent in the UK
  • The United States leads the world on the equivalent stat for prostate cancer (97.2 per cent) vs. 83.2 percent in the UK
  • Lung cancer: 18.7 percent in the United States vs. 9.6 percent in the UK; bowel cancer: 64.2 percent vs. 56.1 percent
  • Just in case you think I am cherry picking: U.S. survival rates are also better for leukemia, ovarian cancer, stomach cancer, and liver cancer—all of those for which I can find comparisons
  • The age- and sex-standardized 30-day mortality rate for ischaemic stroke is just 3.6 per cent in the United States vs. 9.2 per cent in the UK; for haemorrhagic stroke, the figures are 22 percent vs. 26.5 percent

I could go on. All of which is to show that your probability of dying from a range of common conditions is much higher in the UK than here. Perhaps that’s why (with no hint of irony) The Guardian’s write-up of a Commonwealth Fund Report suggesting the UK’s health system was “the best in the world” said “the only serious black mark against the NHS was its poor record on keeping people alive.”

Federal R&D Funding

The federal government spent $147 billion on research and development in 2016, including $77 billion on defense and $70 billion on nondefense. Federal R&D spending has risen in recent decades on a constant-dollar basis, but has dipped as a share of gross domestic product. The AAAS has the data here.

How much should the federal government spend on R&D? AAAS data show that 23 percent of federal spending is for “basic” research, 25 percent is for “applied” research, and 52 percent is for “development.” Most economists would support the basic part, but be more skeptical of the applied and development parts because the private sector handles those activities.

The largest portion of federal nondefense R&D is for health care. In the Wall Street Journal today, a professor emeritus at Harvard Medical School questions the value of this funding. Tom Stossel argues that the private sector makes most medical advances:

The assumption seems to be that the root of all medical innovation is university research, primarily funded by federal grants. This is mistaken. The private economy, not the government, actually discovers and develops most of the insights and products that advance health. The history of medical progress supports this conclusion.  

… In America, innovation came from physicians in universities and research institutes that were supported by philanthropy. Private industry provided chemicals used in the studies and then manufactured therapies on a mass scale.

… Since then, improvements in health have accumulated. Life expectancy has increased. Deaths from heart attack and stroke have radically decreased, and cancer mortality has declined. New drugs and devices have ameliorated the pain and immobility of diseases like arthritis. Yet the question remains: Is the government responsible for these improvements? The answer is largely no. Washington-centric research, rather, might slow progress.

… By contrast, private investment in medicine has kept pace with the aging population and is the principal engine for advancement. More than 80% of new drug approvals originate from work solely performed in private companies.

Cato’s Terence Kealey is also a skeptic of government-funded science.

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Should You Take the Government’s Dietary Advice?

Recently, I’ve worked with the excellent Cato Multimedia team on the first edition of a project you’ll be seeing more of: Ask a Cato Expert.

In this first episode, I’ve answered the question of “Should you take the government’s dietary advice?” I highlight the history behind our current dietary guidelines, and come to the conclusion one should not. Please take a look at the video below, and tweet us new questions at #AskACatoExpert!

 

Surge in Emergency Department Use Persists in New Oregon Medicaid Study

One of the main arguments proponents of Medicaid expansion make, at least on the fiscal side, is that it would save money as people gaining Medicaid coverage would reduce their use of expensive visits to the Emergency Department (ED). An earlier study from the Oregon Health Insurance Experiment threw some cold water on that theory, as it found that getting Medicaid actually increased the number of ED visits by 40 percent. Some analysts postulated that this increase was only temporary because it was due to either pent-up demand for health care services, or because new enrollees did not have established relationships with doctors. The thinking was that after enrollees became familiar with their coverage or addressed long-gestating health problems, the reductions in ED use and the associated cost savings would materialize.

A new report analyzing a longer time horizon finds that this is not the case, and there is “no evidence that the increase in ED use due to Medicaid coverage is driven by pent-up demand that dissipates over time; the effect on ED use appears to persist over the first two years.” This is another blow to the oft-repeated claim that Medicaid expansion will lead to significant savings from reduced Emergency Department utilization, and the effect actually seems to work in the other direction.

The Oregon case is important because it is one of the few instances of random assignment in health insurance, as the state wanted to expand Medicaid but had funding constraints, so it employed a lottery to determine who would get coverage. 

In this new update, the researchers see if there are any time patterns or signs of dissipation when it comes to the impact of Medicaid percent of the population with an ED visit or the number of ED visits per person. They expand upon the earlier utilization study to analyze the two years following the 2008 lottery and break up into six-month segments to see if there are any signs of the effects dissipating.

As they explain, “there is no statistical or substantive evidence of any time pattern in the effect on ED use on either variable.” In the first six-month tranche Medicaid coverage increased the number of ED visits per person by about 65 percent relative to the control group, and the estimates for the following three periods were similar and mostly statistically indistinguishable from each other. They also find that Medicaid increases the probability of an ED visit in the first period by nine percent, and the impact in the subsequent periods does not differ significantly. 

Estimated Effect of Medicaid Coverage on Emergency Department Use over Time

Source: Finkelstein et al., New England Journal of Medicine (2016).

Berniecare Would Increase Federal Expenditure by $32 Trillion Over Next Decade, Twice as Much as Campaign Claimed

Fresh off his resounding victory in the West Virginia primary, Senator Bernie Sanders has intimated that he has no intent of dropping out of the race any time soon, even though he trails his rival Hillary Clinton significantly in pledged delegates. One of the cornerstones of the Sanders campaign has been his health care plan, which would replace the entirety of the current health care system with a more generous version of Medicare. His campaign has claimed the plan would cost a little more than $13.8 trillion over the next decade, and he has proposed to fund these new expenditures with a clutch of tax increases, many of them levied on higher-income households. At the time, analysts at Cato and elsewhere expressed skepticism that the cost estimates touted by the campaign accurately accounted for all the increases in federal health expenditures the plan would require, and incorporated costs savings estimates that were overly optimistic. Now, a new study from the left-leaning Urban Institute corroborates many of these concerns, finding that Berniecare would cost twice as much as the $13.8 trillion price tag touted by the Sanders campaign.

The authors from the Urban Institute estimate that Berniecare would increase federal expenditures by $32 trillion, 233 percent, over the next decade. The $15 trillion in additional taxes proposed by Sanders would fail to even cover half of the health care proposal’s price tag, leaving a funding gap of $16.6 trillion. In the first year, federal spending would increase by $2.34 trillion. To give some context, total national health expenditures in the United States were $3 trillion in 2014.

Sanders was initially able to restrict most of the tax increases needed to higher-income households through income-based premiums, significantly increasing taxes on capital gains and dividends, and hiking marginal tax rates on high earners. Sanders cannot squeeze blood from the same stone twice, and there’s likely not much more he could do to propose higher taxes on these households, which means if he were to actually have to find ways to finance Berniecare, he’d have to turn to large tax increases on the middle class.

There are different reasons Berniecare would increase federal health spending so significantly. The most straightforward is that it would replace all other forms of health care, from employer sponsored insurance to state and local programs, with one federal program. The second factor is that the actual program would be significantly more generous than Medicare (and the European health systems Sanders so often praises), while also removing even cursory cost-sharing requirements. In addition, this proposal would add new benefits, like a comprehensive long-term services and support (LTSS) component that the Urban Institute estimates would cost $308 billion in its first year and $4.14 trillion over the next decade. These estimates focus on annual cash flows over a relatively short time period, so the study doesn’t delve into the longer-term sustainability issues that might develop from this new component, although they do note that “after this 10-year window, we would anticipate that costs would grow faster than in previous years as baby boomers reach age 80 and older, when rates of severe disability and LTSS use are much higher. Revenues would correspondingly need to grow rapidly over the ensuing 20 years.”

Even at twice the initial price tag claimed by the Sanders campaign, these cost estimates from the Urban Institute might actually underestimate the total costs. As they point out, the authors do not incorporate estimates for the higher utilization of health care services that would almost certainly occur when people move from the current system to the generous, first-dollar coverage in the more generous version of Medicare they would have under this proposal. They also chose not to incorporate higher provider payment rates for acute care services that might be necessary, and include “assumptions about reductions in drug prices [that] are particularly aggressive and may fall well short of political feasibility.”

Berniecare would increase federal government spending by $32 trillion over the next decade, more than twice as much as the revenue from the trillions in taxes Sanders has proposed. And this might not be underselling the actual price tag, and only considers the cash flow issues in the short-term. There could be even greater sustainability problems over a longer time horizon. One thing is for certain the plan would require even more trillions in additional tax hikes.

More Losses Ahead for Obamacare’s Troubled CO-OPs

Twelve of the 23 Obamacare health cooperatives (CO-OPs) have shut down already. 627,000 people were enrolled in CO-OPs that ceased operations, and the federal government had disbursed more than $1.2 billion to these CO-OPs, and it might be difficult to ever recover any of these taxpayer funds. A GAO report released this week reveals that the CO-OP losses could be far from over.

4 of the 11 CO-OPs still operating in 2016 have not yet reached the benchmark of 25,000 enrollees, which CMS officials say is the minimum needed for a CO-OP to have financial solvency. More than 69,000 people were enrolled in these plans as of January 2016, and the federal government has already disbursed $265 million of the $407.8 million in loans awarded to them. The people enrolled in these plans and millions of dollars in government outlays are both at risk in the coming year. The map below, based on a figure from the report, shows how level of attrition so far, with the addition of highlighting the states where the CO-OPs have failed to reach the enrollment benchmark.

Wave of Health Insurance CO-OPs to Shut Down in Latest ACA Failure

Hundreds of thousands people will lose their insurance plans as a raft of health insurance cooperatives (CO-OPs) created by the Affordable Care Act will cease operations. Just last week, CO-OPs in Oregon, Colorado, Tennessee and Kentucky announced that they would be winding down operations due to lower than expected enrollment and solvency concerns (although the one in Colorado is suing the state over the shutdown order).  They join four other CO-OPs that have announced that they would be closing their doors. In total, only 15 out of the 23 CO-OPs created by the law remain. These closures reveal how ill-advised this aspect of the ACA was both in terms of lost money and the turmoil for the people who enrolled in them. The eight that have failed have received almost $1 billion in loans, and overall CO-OPs received loans totaling $2.4 billion that might never get paid back. In addition, roughly 400,000 people will lose their plans.

Sources:  Sabrina Corlette et al. “The Affordable Care Act CO-OP Program: Facing Both Barriers and Opportunities for More Competitive Health Insurance Markets,” The Commonwealth Fund, March 12, 2015; Erin Marshal, “8 Things to Know About Insurance CO-OP Closures,” Becker’s Hospital Review, October 20, 2015. Created using Tableau.

Notes: Hawaii and Alaska not shown. Neither state had a CO-OP. CoOportunity Health served both Iowa and Nebraska.

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