Tag: american health care system

Oral Contraceptives Should be Free (From the Third-Party Trap)

An argument will soon erupt over the fate of the Affordable Care Act’s mandate that requires health insurance to cover oral contraceptives at no direct out of pocket cost to the patient. This mandate was never explicitly listed in the ACA as one of the “essential health benefits.” Its inclusion was made at the discretion of the HHS Secretary. According to press reports, the Trump Administration is about to relax the requirement.

The arguments made in favor of loosening the mandate mostly revolve around the employers’ right to freedom of conscience. Meanwhile, some advocacy groups fear this will mean many women won’t be able to obtain affordable oral contraceptives. As I recently wrote in Morning Consult, it can help temper the concerns of all parties to the argument if the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) followed the recommendation that the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) has been making for decades, and reclassify oral contraceptives from prescription to over the counter (OTC). Birth control pills are already available over the counter in 102 countries.

But health insurance plans usually only cover prescription drugs. Making birth control pills available OTC means that women can purchase them directly, like they purchase aspirin, ibuprofen, antihistamines and antacids.

In my Morning Consult piece, I point out that the average cash price of prescription birth control pills runs from $20 to $50 per month but can range as low as $9 per month. Various community health centers across the US, as well as Planned Parenthood, offer free oral contraceptives for those unable to afford them. If birth control pills are made available over the counter prices are likely to drop. That’s because oral contraceptives will be liberated from the third-party spending trap.

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Google Co-Founders Sergey Brin & Larry Page: Health Care Regulation Is Blocking Innovation

At a forum sponsored by Khosla Ventures, Google co-founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page discussed the burden of health care regulations in the United States. When asked, “Can you imagine Google becoming a health company?”, Brin responded:

Health is just so heavily regulated, it’s just a painful business to be in. It’s just not necessarily how I want to spend my time. Even though we do have some health projects, and we’ll be doing that to a certain extent. But I think the regulatory burden in the U.S. is so high that I think it would dissuade a lot of entrepreneurs.

Page agreed:

I am really excited about the possibility of data also to improve health. But I think that’s what Sergey’s saying. It’s so heavily regulated, it’s a difficult area…I do worry, you know, we kind of regulate ourselves out of some really great possibilities.

But surely, the United States does not have government-run health care.

The discussion begins at about 29:00.

Tuesday Links

  • Price controls have failed in the past and there is no reason to think they will work now. So why is the president proposing price controls on health care? Michael Tanner: “Attempts to control prices by government fiat ignore basic economic laws – and the result could be disastrous for the American health-care system.”