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July 29, 2006 6:07PM

Capitalism Saves

The Sunday New York Times has a great article — the first of a series on aging — titled "So Big and Healthy Nowadays That Grandpa Wouldn't Even Know You." Reporter Gina Kolata begins with this 19th-century biography:

Valentin Keller enlisted in an all-German unit of the Union Army in Hamilton, Ohio, in 1862. He was 26, a small, slender man, 5 feet 4 inches tall, who had just become a naturalized citizen. He listed his occupation as tailor.

A year later, Keller was honorably discharged, sick and broken. He had a lung ailment and was so crippled from arthritis in his hips that he could barely walk.

His pension record tells of his suffering. “His rheumatism is so that he is unable to walk without the aid of crutches and then only with great pain,” it says. His lungs and his joints never got better, and Keller never worked again.

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July 28, 2006 4:59PM

Fusionism Gone Cold?

Here's a piece from the Washington Times covering last week's America's Future Foundation–sponsored debate between Reason's Nick Gillespie and National Review's Jonah Goldberg. The debate's topic was the state of the libertarian/conservative alliance (Or, as the ad copy put it, libertarians and conservatives: "are we best friends forever?"). I missed the debate, but in my view, the answer is emphatically "no." 

The American Prospect's Matt Yglesias provided one of the best short explanations for why the answer is "no" on his blog a while back. As a guy on the center-left, Yglesias stands well outside the conservative-libertarian alliance and thus may be in a better position than the rest of us to see what's going on. 

Matt points out that the Right is made up of two kinds of people, those who are "motivated primarily by a distrust of the state" and those who "are motivated more by a distrust of leftwingers." This is not quite the same as saying "the libertarian-conservative alliance is made up of libertarians and conservatives," since there are conservatives who are consistent opponents of statism and self-identified libertarians whose main focus is opposing the Left. 

From the New Deal to the 1990s, political conditions in America favored an anti-left/anti-state alliance, since the Left, for the most part, controlled the state:

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July 28, 2006 4:45PM

The New Social Engineering

Apparently I'm behind the times. I've always understood the term "social engineering" to mean what the American Heritage Dictionary calls "the practical application of sociological principles to particular social problems," or what Mises called "treat[ing] human beings in the same way in which the engineer treats the stuff out of which he builds bridges, roads, and machines."

But in Thursday's Wall Street Journal I discover that "social engineering" now means "tactics that try to fool users into giving up sensitive financial data that criminals can use to steal their money and even their identities." It includes "phishing" and other online scam tactics. If you Google "social engineering," you can wade through pages and pages before you find any links to the older meaning.

I guess there is a connection between the two kinds of social engineering. One online tech dictionary says, "Social engineering is manipulating people into doing what you want, in much the same way that electrical engineering is manipulating electronics into doing what you want."

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July 28, 2006 2:58PM

A Telling Analogy

From the Washington Post:

"At this point, it seems like the war on drugs in America," added Spec. David Fulcher, 22, a medic from Lynchburg, Va., who sat [in a barracks in Baghdad]. "It's like this never-ending battle, like, we find one IED, if we do find it before it hits us, so what? You know it's just like if the cops make a big bust, next week the next higher-up puts more back out there."

July 28, 2006 12:36PM

Getting People to Love Welfare for Politicians

The lobbying campaign to reconstruct the presidential public financing program continues apace. Its authors have designed the bill to appeal to marginal presidential candidates of both parties; it will be less favored by incumbent presidents and skilled fundraisers like Hillary Rodham Clinton. But Congress,  not third-tier candidates, have the authority to enact the bill into law. 

Members of Congress know the public rejects the presidential system. The number of households checking off the box on the tax form has dropped from 28 percent in 1978 to 11 percent in 2002. It is probably under 10 percent today. Why should Congress pour more money into a program that the public has seen in action and rejected so completely?

Well, if public opinion is a problem for “reform,” coercion is the solution.

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July 28, 2006 10:50AM

Hey, GOP: Combat Anti‐​worker Image by Being Pro‐​worker!

Any real concern House Republicans may have for low-wage workers is apparently evaporating in the heat of the midterm elections.

Here's the GOP political calculus, as reported by the New York Times:

Republican moderates used a closed party meeting on Thursday to make their case for a vote, saying it was crucial for helping to dispel the party’s antiworker image. The moderates ran into opposition from conservatives who said the wage proposal could turn off campaign contributors with the elections looming and drive away the party’s business base. But some lawmakers said opponents also recognized the political necessity of giving moderates some political cover, a prospect more appealing than potentially losing their majority in the House.

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July 27, 2006 1:57PM

Hmm. Students Are Leaving… Maybe We Should Improve?

This headline and story, ladies and gentlemen, is what market education reform is all about:

School board, staff to address student exodus


Saying it's time to take a direct role in addressing parents' concerns about district schools, the Columbus Public Schools Board of Education pledged to create a vision statement to guide policies that will strengthen the city schools and keep students from leaving.

At the same time, administrators and staff members promised to work together on ways to make the the district better.

Board members held a special meeting last Thursday, along with administrators and members of the district's employee unions, to discuss a survey that said one in nine parents plans to withdraw their child from CPS this year.

That, in a district that has lost nearly 7,000 students to charter schools over the past several years, and stands to lose more because of private school vouchers this fall....