Freedom: Art as the Messenger

Freedom means something different to every person, yet its value is a common bond between Americans. In these polarized times, Freedom: Art as the Messenger aims to provide a unifying platform of civility and creativity. Artists from across the country–in a wide range of media–share innovative and thought-provoking perspectives on freedom and the enduring need for its protection.

The Cato Institute presents its inaugural art exhibition, Freedom: Art as the Messenger. The exhibition is free and open to the public from April 11 to June 14, 2019.

Three New Ways for Congress to Legalize Illegal Immigrants

Previous immigration reform proposals have failed, largely because policymakers disagreed over whether and how to legalize illegal immigrants. Future immigration reform proposals must be different from previous proposals if there is any hope of them becoming law. A new research brief from Alex Nowrasteh and David Bier offers three proposals for legalizing illegal immigrants that will overcome some of the main political objections in the past.

Why the Government Should Not Regulate Content Moderation of Social Media

Many conservatives argue that Facebook and Google are monopolies seeking to restrict conservative speech. In contrast, some on the left complain that large social media platforms fostered both Trump’s election in 2016 and violence in Charlottesville in 2017. Many on both sides believe that government should actively regulate the moderation of social media platforms to attain fairness, balance, or other values. In a new paper, Cato scholar John Samples argues that preventing harms caused by “fake news” or “hate speech” lies well beyond the jurisdiction of the government.

New Billboards in New York City Area Blame the Onerous Jones Act for Snarling Traffic

The Cato Institute is launching a new billboard campaign in the heavily trafficked New York City region this month to educate motorists on the impact of the Jones Act on their daily commute. The boards direct readers to BlameJonesAct.com, which explains that the Merchant Marine Act of 1920, better known as the Jones Act, helps clog America’s highways with 18-wheelers by making it prohibitively expensive for companies to ship goods via container ships, which would be a cheaper and more efficient option were it not for the act.

CATO TODAY NEWSLETTER

Daily dose of liberty delivered straight to your inbox.

Recent Commentary

Events

April 22

The Simon Abundance Index: A New Way to Measure Availability of Resources

Featuring David M. Simon, Lawyer, Eimer Stahl LLP, Chicago; Gale Pooley, Associate Professor of Business Management, Brigham Young University–Hawaii; George Gilder, Investor, writer, economist, techno-utopian, and author of Life after Google; moderated by Marian L. Tupy, Senior Policy Analyst, Center for Global Liberty and Prosperity, Cato Institute; Editor, www.humanprogress.org.

11:00AM to 12:30PM EDT
Hayek Auditorium, Cato Institute

April 24

Two Roads to War: How (and Why) America and Britain Decided to Invade Iraq

Featuring Patrick Porter, Professor of International Security and Strategy, University of Birmingham, and Senior Associate Fellow, Royal United Services Institute; Michael Mazarr, Senior Political Scientist, RAND Corporation; Colonel Lawrence B. Wilkerson (Ret.), Distinguished Visiting Professor of Government and Public Policy, College of William & Mary; moderated by Christopher Preble, Vice President for Defense and Foreign Policy Studies, Cato Institute.

12:00PM to 1:30PM EDT
Hayek Auditorium, Cato Institute

Of Special Note

The Inclusive Economy: How to Bring Wealth to America’s Poor

The Inclusive Economy: How to Bring Wealth to America's Poor

The Inclusive Economy: How to Bring Wealth to America’s Poor energetically challenges the conventional wisdom of both the right and the left that underlies much of the contemporary debate over poverty and welfare policy. Author and national public policy expert Michael Tanner takes to task conservative critiques of a “culture of poverty” for their failure to account for the structural circumstances in which the poor live. In addition, he criticizes liberal calls for fighting poverty primarily through greater redistribution of wealth and new government programs.

Special! 10 Copies for $10

Cato Pocket Constitution

To encourage people everywhere to better understand and appreciate the principles of government that are set forth in America’s founding documents, the Cato Institute published this pocket-size edition.

Now Available

Home Study Resources

The Cato Institute offers a wealth of online educational audio and video resources, from self-paced guides on the ideas of liberty and the principles of economics, to exclusive, archived lectures by thinkers such as Milton Friedman and F. A. Hayek. Browse through some highlights of our collections, for personal study or for use in the classroom.

Sphere Summit: Teaching Civic Culture Together

For more than four decades, the Cato Institute has introduced people, including millions of young people, to the ideas of freedom. Many Cato books are already taught in high school curricula across the country. To advance the ideas of liberal democracy and the rule of law, Cato has developed the Sphere Summit for educators. The opening Summit seminar, “Teaching Civic Culture Together,” will be held at the Cato Institute in Washington, DC, on July 14–18, 2019.