Reports of the death of U.S. manufacturing have been greatly exaggerated. By historic standards and relative to other countries’ manufacturing sectors, U.S. manufacturing is firing on all cylinders. But that could change if policymakers keep trying to fix what ain’t broke. Spreading myths about the precariousness of U.S. manufacturing and laying the blame on trade policy may score political points with the unions. But if Congress passes legislation that compromises the access of U.S. producers to international markets, there will be real problems to solve.

More on Manufacturing Trade

Commentary

U.S. Abides Global Trade Rules…Just Ignore the Steel Protectionism, Antidumping Abuse, WTO Violations, Etc.

By Daniel J. Ikenson. Forbes. July 16, 2014.

The Myth of a U.S. Manufacturing Decline

By Daniel J. Ikenson. The Wall Street Journal (Online). June 4, 2014.

How Regulations Harm U.S. Manufacturing

By Daniel J. Ikenson. The Wall Street Journal (Online). June 2, 2014.

Cato Studies

Regulatory Protectionism: A Hidden Threat to Free Trade

By K. William Watson and Sallie James. Policy Analysis No. 723. April 9, 2013.

License to Drill: The Case for Modernizing America’s Crude Oil and Natural Gas Export Licensing Systems

By Scott Lincicome. Free Trade Bulletin No. 50. February 21, 2013.

Countervailing Calamity: How to Stop the Global Subsidies Race

By Scott Lincicome. Policy Analysis No. 710. October 9, 2012.

Public Filings

Manufacturing in the USA: How U.S. Trade Policy Offshores Jobs

By Daniel J. Ikenson. Testimony. September 21, 2011.

Made in America: Increasing Jobs through Exports and Trade

By Daniel J. Ikenson. Testimony. March 16, 2011.

America’s Win-Win-Win Trade Relations With China

By Daniel Griswold. Testimony. October 31, 2003.