The modern idea that the Constitution, without further amendment, is an infinitely elastic document that allows government to grow to meet public demands of whatever kind must be challenged. Americans must come to appreciate that the Founding Fathers, who were keenly aware of the expansive tendencies of government, wrote the Constitution precisely to check that kind of thinking and that possibility. The Founders meant government to be our servant, not our master, and they meant it to serve us in a very limited way—by securing our rights, as the Declaration of Independence says, and by doing those few other things that government does best, as spelled out in the Constitution.

More on Constitutional Studies

Commentary

The Forever-War President: Obama’s ‘Transformational’ War Powers Legacy

By Gene Healy. The Federalist. October 10, 2014.

Taxes, Fines and Government Extortion

By Richard W. Rahn. Washington Times. October 6, 2014.

Economists’ Arguments against Obamacare Lawsuits Backfire

By Jonathan H. Adler and Michael F. Cannon. Washington Times. September 24, 2014.

Cato Studies

Articles

Truthiness and the First Amendment

Ilya Shapiro, Trevor Burrus and Gabriel Latner. Journal of Constitutional Law Heightened Scrutiny. Vol. 16. May 2014.

Constitutional Interpretation: Lessons From the American Experience

Roger Pilon. Századvég Foundation Conference (Budapest) Keynote Address. October 3, 2013.

The Beginning of the End of the Gay Marriage Debate

Ilya Shapiro. Engage. Vol. 14. No. 1. Summer 2013.

Public Filings

Horne v. U.S. Dept. of Agriculture

By Steffen N. Johnson, Eimeric Reig-Pleissis, Christopher E. Mills, Ilya Shapiro & Trevor Burrus. Legal Briefs. October 8, 2014.

Halbig v. Burwell

By Jonathan H. Adler and Michael F. Cannon. Legal Briefs. October 6, 2014.

Dept. of Transportation v. Association of American Railroads

By Jeffrey S. Bucholtz, Brian Callanan and Ilya Shapiro. Legal Briefs. September 29, 2014.

Cato Reviews & Journals

Looking Ahead: October Term 2014

Miguel A. Estrada and Ashley S. Boizelle. Supreme Court Review. 2013-2014.

Evolving Technology and the Fourth Amendment: The Implications of Riley v. California

Andrew Pincus. Supreme Court Review. 2013-2014.

Bond v. United States: Concurring in the Judgment

Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz. Supreme Court Review. 2013-2014.

Events

Overruled: The Long War for Control of the U.S. Supreme Court

Featuring Roger Pilon and Walter Olson. November 3, 2014. Book Forum.

Pruitt, Halbig, King & Indiana: Is ObamaCare Once Again Headed to the Supreme Court?

Featuring Michael F. Cannon and Jonathan H. Adler. October 30, 2014. Conference.

War without Debate: The Constitution, Intervention, and the Strikes against ISIS

Featuring Gene Healy, Christopher A. Preble and John Maniscalco. October 7, 2014. Capitol Hill Briefing.