American Christians Should Stop Hurting Sudanese Christians With Sanctions

KHARTOUM, SUDAN—Ubiquitous American advertising is absent in Sudan. Washington bans most imports and exports to the country. Among the strongest supporters of economic coercion have been American Christians, seeking to punish the Muslim-dominated central government for its brutal conduct in past ethnic conflicts.

While the combat has largely ceased, the embargo remains. And Sudanese Christians with whom I recently spoke said that they suffer when Washington penalizes the Sudanese people for Khartoum’s sins. Rev. Filotheos Farag of Khartoum’s El Shahidein Coptic Church, explained “we want to cancel all the sanctions.”

The Clinton administration first imposed restrictions two decades ago for Sudan’s alleged sponsorship of terrorism. But the Obama administration admits that Khartoum cooperates with the United States today.

The Right to Pay for Your Own Lawyer

Criminal asset forfeiture has the taste of Old Testament justice: an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth. The bank robber stole $100,000, so the government takes $100,000 from him. That seems right and fair, but only if we know that the defendant’s guilty.

If the government took $100,000 from someone who was innocent, or whose guilt was ambiguous, it wouldn’t merely be an “unjust” forfeiture, it would be theft—or, to be more politic, an uncompensated and unwarranted taking.

Consider the case of Sila Luis. For several years, Luis ran a healthcare company that provided home nursing services to patients enrolled in Medicare. In 2012, the government accused Luis of fraud, claiming that her company billed Medicare for unnecessary services. In addition to criminal charges, the grand jury indictment included a forfeiture finding, stipulating that if Luis is convicted, up to $45 million of her personal assets would be forfeited, to make up for all of the money her company ever received from Medicare.

A Very Simple Plan to Balance the Budget by 2021

Earlier this month, Americans for Prosperity held a “Road to Reform” event in Las Vegas.

I got to be the warm-up speaker and made two simple points.

First, we made a lot of fiscal progress between 2009 and 2014 because various battles over debt limits, shutdowns, and sequestration actually did result in real spending discipline.

Second, I used January’s 10-year forecast from the Congressional Budget Office to explain how easy it would be to balance the budget with a modest amount of future spending restraint.

Here’s my speech:

Americans Want Politicians to Tackle Debt

A new poll by the Peter G. Peterson Foundation finds that 80 percent of Americans think that rising federal debt should be a top priority of policymakers. The poll also finds that:

… an overwhelming majority of voters (85%) are now calling for the President and Congress to spend more time addressing our nation’s long-term fiscal future. More than two-thirds (68%) say their concern about this vital issue has increased over the last few years, including nearly one-half (46%) who say it has increased “a lot.” Majorities of voters across party lines, including 53% of Democrats, 69% of Independents, and 84% of Republicans, say that their concerns about the debt have deepened in recent years.

The spokesman for the Peterson Foundation said that Americans “…want candidates to put forward plans to address our nation’s long-term fiscal challenges … Americans understand that putting our fiscal house in order is vital to ensure a growing, prosperous economy and are calling for more action from their leaders.” I agree with that, and so does the centrist group “First Budget,” which is trying to pin down candidates on fiscal specifics.

Rising Chinese Frustration with North Korea

SHENYANG, CHINA—Public space is shrinking in China for discussion of “Western” views. But “contrary to the general crackdown, North Korea policy seems to be an exception,” a U.S. diplomat told me on my recent trip to China. One hears plenty of criticism of Pyongyang.

Even official Beijing’s unhappiness with the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea is evident, though China continues to bankroll the Kim Jong-un regime. It’s a position some Chinese would like to change, including a scholar in Shenyang, a couple hours away from the Yalu by car. My colleague was careful not to directly criticize Beijing policy but advocated a much different approach. He noted that the two nations “still care about each other,” but now there are a “lot of problems between the countries.”

The most important issue, no surprise, is nuclear weapons. China supports denuclearization of the Korean peninsula. This is the “worst disagreement between them.”
Second is economic development. “China insists on reform of the whole economic and political system,” explained my friend. Beijing’s objective is to “transform North Korea.” The DPRK government fears such change.

Issue number three involves bilateral commerce. “China wants to have normal trade with North Korea,” but the DPRK expects to receive goods even if it does not pay. This has “caused great loss for China and for companies in China.”

Whitney Ball: Losing a Sparkplug for Liberty

Whitney Ball was always outraged for the right reasons and could be counted on to add the choicest comments to the latest political or cultural atrocity. She was bright, opinionated, well-informed, and dedicated to human liberty. She also was a great friend. Those who knew her and the liberty movement were made much worse off with her recent passing.

Whitney is one of the largely unknown political activists who did far more than her share to help others. She got into the movement early, working in Washington, D.C. at the National Journalism Center for the late M. Stanton Evans—a grand figure who linked the older, more traditional and newer, more assertive conservative movements. But Whitney never hesitated to take the lone road. She was rare, a libertarian and Christian. We met when she worked at Cato a couple decades ago. She exuded kindness and wit and was impossible to dislike.

She moved on to the Philanthropy Roundtable, a conservative counterpart for the liberal Council on Foundations. Then in 1999 Whitney launched her own venture, Donors Trust. From very modest beginnings—one account—DT turned into a major success. It hit roughly 200 contributors in 2013 and to date has channeled $740 million to the cause of liberty. There is a long history of freedom-minded donors’ money being effectively hijacked by left-wing activists and causes. Money created from the inspiration and sweat of past entrepreneurs now funds some of the organizations most determined to stifle a free economy. It turns out that those most adept at creating wealth often aren’t very good at controlling how it is distributed.

Monetary Rules: Solving the Knowledge Problem

In its “Free Exchange” column, the Economist recently took up the issue of monetary rules. Provocatively titled “Rule It Out,” the column announced that “setting interest rates according to a fixed formula is a bad idea.”

Reading the column one quickly learns the author doesn’t understand what constitutes a rule, and what the argument for a rule is. The column moves from a general consideration of monetary rules to considering specifically the Taylor Rule. I leave it to Professor Taylor to defend his rule, which he did on his blog. I, however, consider the general case for monetary rules.