If You Build It, They Still Won’t Come

A report commissioned by the Maryland Stadium Authority and the Montgomery County Department of Economic Development tells the planners what they want to hear: that a new sports and entertainment arena in Montgomery County, Maryland, could generate revenue for the county and would give residents a place to hold events without having to leave the county. Based on the Washington Post story, it’s not clear just how strong the report’s argument is: by definition, building a new arena would provide a venue for events, so that’s not much of a claim; and the news story does not tell us if the revenue generated would make it economically viable.

But maybe the report did claim economic viability. Most studies commissioned by planners do. But independent studies never do. This short review of the academic literature finds that “not only are there theoretical reasons to believe that economic impact studies of large sporting events may overstate the true impact of the event, but in practice the ex ante estimates of economic benefits far exceed the ex post observed economic development of host communities following mega-events or stadium construction.”

Last year the Wall Street Journal reported

But while arenas with big-time tenants may bolster a city’s self-image and quality of life, evidence shows they have a minimal economic upside. Most operate at a loss.

In “The Economics of Sports Facilities and Their Communities,” published in 2000 in the Journal of Economic Perspectives, authors Andrew Zimbalist of Smith College and John Siegfried of Vanderbilt University argue that “independent work on the economic impact of stadiums and arenas has uniformly found that there is no statistically significant positive correlation between sports facility construction and economic development.”

The authors cite several studies, including one by sports economist Robert Baade that found “no significant difference in personal income growth from 1958 to 1987 between 36 metropolitan areas that hosted a team in one of the four premier professional sports leagues and 12 otherwise comparable areas that did not.” The authors’ conclusion: Arenas put a drag on the local economy by hurting spending on other activities in the city and boosting municipal costs such as security.

“It doesn’t make sense to build an arena for economic reasons, even if you have a team,” Mr. Zimbalist says.

Several Cato studies have reviewed the literature on stadiums and arenas, as noted here.

Tax and Regulatory Competition Make the Caymans an Ideal Home for Hedge Funds

The New York Times has a detailed story showing how good tax policy and a sensible approach to regulation have made the Cayman Islands the world’s premier domicile for hedge funds. The irritates politicians in Washington and other national capitals, but the article correctly notes that Cayman funds and American investors and managers are obeying all U.S. laws. This leaves two options for politicians. They can engage in fiscal protectionism and try to criminalize free trade in financial services, or they can improve the tax and regulatory environment in America. Sadly, it does not take a political expert to know which route is more likely:

…lucrative tax breaks and fabled financial secrecy have made this British territory a magnet for hedge fund managers. “All of the offshore jurisdictions are competing against each other to provide the most hospitable regulatory landscape, and the Caymans are really coming on strong,” Mr. Grayson says. …In as little as two weeks, and for about $35,000 in fees, hedge funds can set up shop in the Caymans — just a fraction of the time and up to one-tenth the price of incorporating a fund in drearier climes like Delaware. While speed and bargain prices are big attractions, the real draw, say analysts and Congressional investigators, are perfectly legal Caymans-based corporations and partnerships that allow major investors to avoid taxes of up to 35 percent that the Internal Revenue Service levies on unearned business income. Cayman tax laws also help American fund managers legally defer domestic taxes on their personal profits by channeling them offshore through their funds. …it is the corporate home for what the Cayman Islands Monetary Authority estimates to be three out of every four of the world’s hedge funds — more than anywhere else — thanks to its friendly tax and regulatory regimes, as well as an army of foreign bankers, tax lawyers, accountants and fund administrators who make it all work. …foreign individual investors and tax-exempt American investors — like pension plans, hospitals and university endowments — are allowed to put their money into another section of the fund that is registered offshore, in the Caymans. The American institutions have that option because, while they are tax-exempt under American tax law, a United States tax on unearned business income would apply if they invested in a domestic fund. …Some 8,500 investment funds are registered in the Cayman Islands, according to the agency — a near-tripling since 2001.

New Attack Planned Against Low-Tax Jurisdictions

The UK-based Observer reports that Norway’s socialist government is leading a new campaign against low-tax jurisdiction.

The premises are absurd, including the assumption that developing nations will prosper if they get more tax revenue. Moreover, the entire scheme is based on some very dubious “facts,” none of which are substantiated. Most importantly, the article fails to note the many benefits of tax competition, including better tax policy and the protection of human rights:

Plans have been drawn up for an international taskforce to crack down on tax haven abuses orchestrated in large part by bankers, accountants and lawyers in London. As authoritative evidence suggests that $1 trillion of illicit funds flow to secretive havens managed by financiers based in London, New York and Dubai, the Norwegian government is forming a global coalition to ‘facilitate the recovery of assets illicitly stacked away in tax havens’. Several countries are set to join, but Britain, recently classed as an offshore financial centre by the International Monetary Fund, is not among them.

…The imminent formation of an international tax haven taskforce comes as the World Bank, headed by Robert Zoellick, is coming under pressure to establish its first forensic study into the illicit cash flowing out of developing nations. …Exactly 10 times the $100bn spent on aid and debt write-offs by rich countries is siphoned out of developing countries, with corporations responsible for 60 per cent of that figure through a web of trusts, nominee accounts and the flagrant mispricing of goods to escape tax.

…Cracking down on tax havens and the evasion of taxes by some of the world’s biggest companies is seen as the ‘missing link’ in the poverty alleviation agenda. Investigators and lawyers at a conference on the Movement of Illicit Funds in Washington last Thursday confirmed it was corporations and not corrupt politicians in the developing world that accounted for most tax evasion.

Don’t Mess with Texas … Pitchers

Southern-born pitchers are more likely than other pitchers to hit batters in situations where they’ve just given up a home run or a teammate has been hit by the opposing pitcher, an academic study says. According to the Washington Post, business professor Thomas Timmerman was studying the impact of race on pitcher-hitter matchups.

Although he found no link between race and the number of times batters were hit by pitches, he did find an interesting geographical link.

“I found that pitchers from the South are not more likely in general to hit batters,” Timmerman said in a telephone interview, “but they are much more likely to hit batters after giving up a home run, or after a teammate has gotten hit the previous half-inning.”

Timmerman theorizes that this results from the South’s “culture of honor.” Born Fighting, Sen. Jim Webb called it in his book about the Scotch-Irish in America. He wrote about the “rednecks” and their “unique and unforgiving code of personal honor.” Webb wouldn’t be surprised at Timmerman’s findings.

Timmerman used a strictly geographic analysis: he classified pitchers by their state of birth. And he found that half of the active U.S.-born control pitchers who have hit the most batters are from 16 Southern states.

It’s just possible that an ethnic analysis would have strengthened his case. Two of the top non-Southerners on the list, Jeff Weaver and David Wells, were born in southern California. Could they be descended from Okies and Arkies or other Scotch-Irish families who kept heading west and carried the “culture of honor” with them?

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Cato@Liberty: Safe For Children

Libertarians are often associated with such out-of-the-mainstream activities as drugs, gambling, prostitution, etc., because out-of-the-mainstream activities are the very things that intolerant mainstream types try to stamp out via coercion.

But according to the web site mingle2.com, the Cato@Liberty blog you’re reading right now would be rated PG by the motion picture industry.  Evidently, the words “drugs” and “torture” kept us from getting that coveted G-rating. 

Good god, have we gone mainstream?

Last Wishes for Trade Policy

With 19 months left in the Bush presidency, June 30 marks the unceremonious end of his trade policy. Though things haven’t looked bright on the trade liberalization front for quite a while, there was a time when the agenda had promise and its keepers had enthusiasm. Tomorrow’s expiration of the president’s trade promotion authority, thus, accentuates the sadness of promise unfilled. On top of that, responsibility for trade policy is returning to a Congress that is, perhaps, more skeptical of trade than any Congress since the days of Smoot and Hawley.

The main goal of the administration’s trade policy was a multilateral trade agreement. That proved elusive, and now the Doha Round lies in a cryogenic state. The administration did bring home some bilateral and regional deals that are important, but relative to what could have and should have been accomplished, it ain’t much.

As we enter the post-TPA period, there are four trade agreements that have been signed, but not yet approved by Congress. The congressional leadership today finally came out and said they will not support the deals with Korea or Colombia (as expected). They offered support for Peru and Panama, but we’ll see whether the rank and file goes along. I’m skeptical.

Regrettably, we may have to endure a dark period on trade policy as members of Congress work to outdo each other with ridiculous, self-defeating legislation. The last responsibility of the Bush administration on trade policy, then, is to hold the line against the onslaught of anti-trade, anti-China legislation and make sure none of those bills becomes law.